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Page last updated at 07:24 GMT, Friday, 28 December 2012
Development data quiz

How much do you know about global development statistics? Here are three questions to test you.


Q1. The number of children who die between birth and their fifth birthday is used as a measure of child health. But how much does child mortality differ between the best and worst off countries in the world?

a. It varies from 2 deaths per 1000 born up to 200 deaths per 1000 born.

b. It varies from 10 deaths per 1000 born up to 100 deaths per 1000 born.

c. It varies from 2 deaths per 1000 born up to 100 deaths per 1000 born.


Q2. Each year about seven million children die globally, mainly from diseases caused by poverty. The main cause of death is diseases affecting the newly-born. What are the other three main causes of death?

a. Pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria.

b. HIV/Aids, natural catastrophes and war & other injuries.

c. Polio, measles and Ebola infections.


Q3. What is the percentage of the world population to have two births per woman and what is the global average number of births per woman?

a. 20% have 2 babies per woman and the world average is 5.5 births per woman

b. 40% have 2 babies per woman and the world average is 4.0 births per woman

c. 80% have 2 babies per woman and the world average is 2.5 births per woman.

Questions set by Dr Hans Rosling.


Send your answers and comments to us, either through the Today Twitter account @BBCR4Today using #developmentquiz or email us using the form below. We'll hopefully read some of them out on air.


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The BBC may edit your comments and not all emails will be published. Your comments may be published on any BBC media worldwide.






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