• News Feeds
Page last updated at 07:13 GMT, Saturday, 8 December 2012
Today: Saturday 8th December

The death of a nurse who took a hoax call about the Duchess of Cambridge was a "tragedy", the chief executive of the Australian radio station behind it has said. More than 40 Starbucks branches will be targeted by UK Uncut, over its tax arrangements. As many newly elected Police and Crime Commissioners legitimately appoint friends and former colleagues to their teams, should there be more accountability? And also on the programme, a photograph of a man taken moments before he was struck by a train has provoked a debate: at what point should journalists intervene?

We are no longer providing clips of every part of the programme but you will be able to listen via the BBC iPlayer .

0709
The owners of the Australian radio station that broadcast the spoof royal interview taken by a nurse who has been found dead, have apologised. The BBC's correspondent Phil Mercer reports.

0713
The leader of Hamas, Khaled Meshaal, is holding a "victory rally" in Gaza today on his first visit to the territory, which is under the control of Hamas. The BBC's correspondent Yolande Knell analyses the importance of the visit.

0715
The annual United Nations talks on climate change are going into overtime in Qatar with major issues still unresolved. The BBC's environmental analyst Roger Harrabin explains.

0718

The 90 year-old Lithuanian born artist Jonas Mekas whose films and photos are now the subject of an exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in London, has also been called the world first blogger. The Today programme's reporter, Mike Thomson met him at the gallery.

0724
Eight police officers have been injured and four people arrested following clashes between loyalists and riot police across Northern Ireland. Trouble began in Belfast when a crowd that was blocking the road attacked a van after its driver had attempted to drive through a loyalist roadblock. Dr Peter Shirlow, expert on conflict research, provides his analysis.

0727
Sport news with Rob Bonnet.

0734
Egypt is in turmoil once again. Its president, Mohammed Morsi, says he wants talks with the opposition but insists that he won't surrender the increased powers he has awarded himself. The BBC's Jon Leyne assesses the mood in Cairo.

0740
The paper review.

0743
Street protests in Moscow and a plummeting approval rating have challenged Vladimir Putin's authority. The BBC's Moscow correspondent, Steve Rosenberg, hit the road to find out why many Russians, instead of protesting, are still putting their faith in the president.

0748
Thought for the Day with Reverend Roy Jenkins, Baptist Minister in Cardiff.

0750

More than 40 Starbucks branches will be targeted on Saturday by UK Uncut, over its tax arrangements. Despite the coffee chain saying it will pay £10 million in UK corporation tax for each of the next two years many have criticised the gesture as inadequate, while activists attacked it as an admission of guilt. Treasury minister David Gauke comments.

0810

Many of the 41 newly elected Police and Crime Commissioners have opted to appoint friends and former colleagues to their teams, as they are allowed to by law. But should there be a greater degree of accountability in how appointments are made?

0816
Experts gather at a conference organised by the Wellcome Collection to discuss some interesting and almost unanswerable questions: what is the point of pain? Does everyone experience it in the same way? Has it changed over time?

0821
Eight police officers have been injured in Northern Ireland in the protests by loyalists that started when Belfast City council voted to limit the number of days on which it would fly the union flag. The BBC's correspondent James Cook reports from Belfast.

0824
Sport news with Rob Bonnet.

0829

A nurse at a London hospital who took a hoax phone call about the Duchess of Cambridge has been found dead. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have said in a statement that they were deeply saddened by the death of the nurse, named Jacintha Saldanha. Clementine Ford, an Australian journalist and Jonathan Holmes, presenter of Media Watch on Australia's network discuss.

0840
The paper review.

0843
The annual United Nations talks on climate change are drawing to a close in Qatar with major issues still unresolved. Funding to help poorer countries deal with the effects of global warming remains a key sticking point and rich countries feel they are unable to make specific financial commitments. The BBC's environmental analyst, Roger Harrabin explains in detail.

0849

The foreign secretary says both the British and US governments have seen evidence that the regime in Syria is preparing to use chemical weapons. Mr Hague told the BBC's security correspondent Frank Gardner: "We can't be specific but we have seen enough evidence to know that they need a warning. The president of the United States has talked about "serious consequences" and clearly he means it and so we meant it."

0850
The decision by the New York Post to print a photograph of a man moments before he was struck by a subway train has provoked a debate amongst photographers, journalists and readers over what point news gatherers should intervene. Eamonn McCabe, a photographer and former picture editor at the Guardian and Angela Hobbs, associate professor in Philosophy at Warwick University discuss.


Get in touch with Today via email , Twitter or Facebook or text us on 84844.




BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific