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Page last updated at 06:23 GMT, Friday, 26 October 2012 07:23 UK
Today: Friday 26th October

People wanting to become teachers in England are to face tougher tests in numeracy and literacy, before they can start training. Theoretical physicists have worked out a test that can tell whether we are living in a real world or in some kind of simulated one. And also on the programme, we will ask how we compare with other countries in the way in which we treat our old.

0615
Business news with Simon Jack with a preview of figures that will give an indication of how well the American economy is doing.

0626
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0709
Britain is in the midst of its worst whooping cough outbreak for decades. Dr David Elliman from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health suggests reasons for the increases in cases.

0712
This year has been described as one of the weirdest years for weather on record and the Forestry Commission says that the elements have conspired to give us a particularly spectacular display of autumn colour this year. The BBC's science reporter Rebecca Morelle went to National Arboretum in Westonbirt in Gloucestershire to take a look.

0716
Business news with Simon Jack.

0719
The government will announce today tougher tests in English and maths for prospective teachers before they can start training. Charlie Taylor, chief executive of the Teaching Agency, explains why calculators will be banned and the equivalent of a B grade in maths and English will have to be reached.

0723
The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said he wants to make England "one of the best places in Europe to grow old". BBC News correspondent in Mumbai Rajini Vaidyanathan examines the growing challenge of caring for the elderly in India.

0724
In Belgium a British oil executive has been shot dead in front of his wife in what appears to have been an assassination-style killing.

0727
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0733
A 19-year-old man has been found guilty of the manslaughter of a teenager, who was stabbed during the rush hour at Victoria station in London. Sandra Laville, Guardian crime correspondent, and Gus John of the Institute of Education and former director of education in Hackney, discuss how this incident could have occurred.

0739
The paper review.

0742
Research in the United States appears to indicate a connection between exposure to certain chemicals used in plastics, and an earlier onset of the menopause in women. Amber Cooper from the Washington School of Medicine and leader of the study explains how easy it is to come into contact with these chemicals.

0747
Thought for the Day with Abdal Hakim Murad, a Muslim chaplain at the University of Cambridge.

0750

The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has outlined his ambition to make England "one of the best places in Europe to grow old". Diana Athill, a writer in her 90s who has documented her life in a care home extensively, and Professor James Goodwin, head of research at Age UK explain the reality of growing old in England.

0810

The government will announce today tougher tests in English and maths for prospective teachers before they can start training. Sarah Ebner runs the education blog School Gate and Christine Blower, general secretary of the National Union of Teachers, analyse whether standards in teaching are sliding.

0820

The idea that life, the universe and everything is a computer simulation has been talked about around in philosophy for, but how could you ever find out such a thing was true? Professor Silas Beane, a theoretical physicist behind the research at Bonn University, explains that his group of scientists have come up with a way of testing the hypothesis and Peter Millican, professor of philosophy at Hertford College, questions the logic behind the theory.

0826
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0835
In Belgium a British oil executive has been shot dead in front of his wife in what appears to have been an assassination-style killing.

0841
Business news with Simon Jack.

0844
Today the National Archives is releasing the diaries of Guy Liddell, post war number two at MI5. The BBC's security correspondent Gordon Corera has been looking at the files.

0849

Today the Future Homes Commission, chaired by British business leader Sir John Banham, will publish publishes its findings today. Sir John explains that we now have a unique opportunity to end the housing crisis and add a huge boost to the economy and Sir Merrick Cockell, chair of the Local Government Association, asks whether this investment is it practical.


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