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Page last updated at 06:20 GMT, Thursday, 25 October 2012 07:20 UK
Today: Thursday 25th October

The government will further outline its strategy for welfare reforms today, in particular capping the benefits of people with a certain number of children. A report by MPs says efforts to turn Afghanistan into a viable state may not be successful. And also on the programme, we will look back at the history of the world's oldest record label celebrating 125 years in the business.

0615
Business news with Simon Jack on news that today Microsoft launches its new Windows 8 operating system.

0626
Sports news Garry Richardson.

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It will be harder to get a mortgage following changes to the guidelines under which banks and building societies will operate, according to an announcement by the Financial Services Agency. Martin Wheatley, chief executive designate of the Financial Conduct Authority outlines the theory behind the decision.

0713

The government will further outline its strategy for welfare reforms today, in particular capping the benefits of people with a certain number of children. Alison Garnham, chief executive of Child Poverty Action Group, explains her concerns with the move.

0716
Business news with Simon Jack.

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MPs on the International Development Committee, the government's parliamentary aid watchdog, say Britain may have to recognise that creating a viable state in Afghanistan is not achievable. Sir Malcolm Bruce, chair of the International Development Committee, explains the view that western lives and money have failed to create a working, transparent Afghan government.

0723

The Forestry Commission says a disease that has killed 90% of ash trees in Denmark has been found in the countryside in East Anglia. Th commission's Roger Coppock explains calls for an immediate ban on ash trees from Europe.

0726
Sports news with Simon Jack.

0732

Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Council, will talk with David Cameron today about the PM's insistence that the UK contribution to the EU budget will not exceed inflation increases. Richard Corbett, adviser to the president of the European Council, explains that the UK is not the only country that has threatened to veto the budget.

0738
The paper review.

0741
It is ten years since the first Brit went to die at the assisted-dying organisation Dignitas. Fergus Walsh, BBC medical correspondent, examines the history of Dignitas and Today presenter Evan Davis speaks to Mrs Win Crew, whose husband Reg was the second British person to commit assisted suicide at Dignitas.

0748
Thought for the Day with John Bell of the Iona Community.

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The National Audit Office has released a report warning of the risk of a deterioration in road maintenance across England (excluding London) if planned cuts of 28% of subsidies from the DLCG are put through. Today reporter Zubeida Malik is joined by Paul Watters, head of roads at the AA, by a pothole in Basingstoke.

0810

The government has been sending out letters to up to 60,000 benefits claimants warning them they face a cut in the amount of money they receive from next April. Today reporter Tom Bateman examines the current state of welfare from south wales and Iain Duncan Smith, Work and Pensions Secretary, outlines why the government are saying that those on benefits should not get more money than people who work.

0823

Columbia Records, the oldest record label in the world is celebrating 125 years in the business. Sean Wilentz professor of American history at Princeton University and Adrienne Connors, music editor, at The Sunday Times culture section explain that the label went on to promote some of the 20th century's greatest African American musical artists.

0833
Downing Street has insisted that the prime minister was not referring to tomorrow's growth figures when he told the Labour leader at Question Time that: "I can tell him, the good news will keep coming." The BBC's economics editor Stephanie Flanders explains why it is illegal to leak the GDP figures head of official publication.

0838
The International Development Committee said that as British and other foreign troops withdraw, Britain should reconsider its ambition of building Afghan government institutions in favour of more traditional aid targets - especially improving the lives of Afghan women. Clare Lockhart, co-founder and director of the Institute for State Effectiveness, explains the problems that the situation in Afghanistan presents.

0842
Business news with Simon Jack.

0848
The Financial Services Agency has said that It will be harder to get a mortgage following changes to the guidelines under which banks and building societies will operate. David Hollingworth, mortgage specialist and Duncan Stott, affordable housing campaigner discuss the difficulties that buyer will face.

0853
It is ten years since the first Briton went to die at the assisted-dying organisation Dignitas and this year so far, 35 more have been assisted to die at the facility in Switzeland out of a total of 217 people from th UK. Dr Peter Saunders. the campaign director of the Care Not Killing Alliance, and Lord Falconer, chair of the Commission on Assisted Dying, explore how the arguments have changed and developed over the past decade.


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