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Page last updated at 06:39 GMT, Monday, 10 September 2012 07:39 UK
Today: Monday 10th September

We are no longer providing clips of every part of the programme but you will be able to listen via the BBC iPlayer .

The outgoing leader of the TUC is urging the government to adopt a new economic approach, saying the public funding of the Olympics should be a model. Britain's Olympic and Paralympic athletes are going to parade through London. Also on the programme, what is to be done to reduce the suicide rate among middle aged men in England?

Business news with Simon Jack: Tony Blair was invited to a late night meeting at Claridges to break a deadlock and try and save a £60bn merger between commodities trader Glencore and miner Xstrata.

The Trades Union Congress meet today for the first day of their annual conference. Len McCluskey, general secretary of Unite, explains what he wants from the conference.


Business news with Simon Jack.

The King's School in Tynemouth, which up to now has charged parents thousands of pounds a term, is turning to the state instead because it cannot attract enough pupils. As the BBC's Chris Buckler reports many independent schools are doing the same in the economic downturn.

Sport news with Rob Bonnet.


The number of people killing themselves in this country has been falling over the past few years, except for men in their 40s who are at greater risk than any other group, and it is not clear why. Liberal Democrat MP Norman Lamb explains the concept behind the suicide prevention strategy in England launched by the government today.

The paper review.

Thought for the day with the religious commentator Clifford Longley.


The founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes, honouring improbable, weird, and creative science research, has a book out called This Is Improbable about the awards and the weird and wacky people and ideas he comes across. Marc Abrahams speaks to the Today programme's science correspondent Tom Feilden.

Hekmat Karzai said that prisoners could be released from Bagram prison in Afghanistan within the next few months following the handover of the control from America to the Afghan government.


The TUC's annual conference begins today. Brendan Barber the outgoing leader of the federation explains why they are calling for an alternative to the government's sending cuts and a new economic approach.


How do athletes who took part in the Olympics and Paralympics and did not win get back to leading a normal life following four years of training? Sam Ingram, who won a silver medal in judo in the Paralympics but who expected a gold, and Simon Kuper who writes for the Financial Times, examine what the losers will take away from the games.

Sport news with Rob Bonnet.


Michael Fallon, the newly-appointed business minister, gives his view on how to bring growth to the economy and responds to the TUC's call for an alternative to the spending cuts.

Fahad Al Albinali, spokesperson for the Bahraini Information Affairs Authority, and Maryam Alkhawaja, acting president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, debate the situation in Bahrain where many of the disaffected population are challenging the autocratic regime..

Business news with Simon Jack.

A wave of sectarian and anti-government attacks have hit Iraq, with eleven attacks on Sunday alone, so is Iraq descending back into sectarian conflict? Charles Tripp, professor of Middle East politics at Soas, gives his analysis of the situation.

The King's School in Tynemouth is applying to become a state-funded academy as it is facing the fact that fewer parents can afford its fees. David Bilton, chief executive of the Woodard Schools group, explains how the recession is affecting independent schools.

Last week it emerged that Greece's eurozone creditors were pushing for Greece to undertake a six day week as a condition for their bailout. If the UK adopted the same principal would that really boost the economy or would it be counter-productive? Philosopher Dr Edward Skidelsky and Mark Littlewood, director of the Institute of Economic Affairs, debate.

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