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Page last updated at 07:06 GMT, Wednesday, 22 February 2012
Today: Wednesday 22nd February

The US has warned Syria of what it called additional measures if President Assad fails to end the violence there. Four former staff at the company which holds the government's welfare-to-work contracts have been arrested in a fraud inquiry. And also on today's programme we go inside the so-called "dirty lab" set up to fight against computer hackers.

We are no longer providing clips of every part of the programme but you will be able to listen via the BBC iPlayer .

0615
Business news with Lesley Curwen, on positive indicators on the state of the "real economy". Download the podcast

0651

Britain has overtaken the United States for the standard of its physics research. Dr Beth Taylor of the Institute of Physics explains why.

0709
The Justice Committee is to publish a report into the law around the "presumption of death", when someone disappears for several years. Sir Alan Beith, chairman of the select committee, explains why they believe England should take inspiration from the Scottish system. Listen

0716
Business news with Lesley Curwen.

0718

According to a Commons select committee, we are facing a threat from electro-magnetic pulses which can occur as a result of a nuclear explosion or by other man-made devices. The Today programme's Tom Feilden explains what these pulses are while James Arbuthnot, chairman of the defence select committee, outlines why they believe the government is not taking them seriously enough. Listen

0724
According to an alliance of politicians, regulators and charities, NHS nurses and care workers should sign up to a code of conduct to treat elderly patients with dignity and respect. General secretary of the National Pensioners' Convention, Dot Gibson, outlines their concerns.

0725
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0732

The government is being urged to give a £500m budget boost to business through a series of changes to the tax system aimed at stimulating growth. John Cridland, director general of the CBI, explains why they believe a "modest" amount would help firms create jobs, invest more as well as free up spending on infrastructure. Listen

0737
According to an alliance of politicians, regulators and charities, NHS nurses and care workers should sign up to a code of conduct to treat elderly patients with dignity and respect. General secretary of the National Pensioners' Convention, Dot Gibson, outlines their concerns.

0740
Paper review.

0743
An international conference is being held in London to discuss the current political, humanitarian and security situations in Somalia. Andrew Harding reports from Mogadishu on the challenges remaining for the country in the face of famine, conflict and piracy.

0747
Thought for the day with the writer The Reverend Dr Michael Banner, Dean and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.

0751

David Cameron has called a summit at Downing Street to tackle the issue of discrimination and racism in football. Former Chelsea player Paul Elliott and Guardian writer Deborah Orr discuss whether it will make a difference. Listen

0810

There are reports that at least 50 people, including four children, were killed by government forces across Syria yesterday. Tom Coghlan, correspondent for The Times, describes the scene in Homs where 30 people were killed during a heavy bombardment of the city. Listen

0814

New legislation is needed to make it easier for families to resolve the affairs of missing people, according to a new report by the Justice Select Committee. Peter Lawrence, whose daughter Claudia has been missing for three years, and Rachel Elias, whose brother Richey - the guitarist with the band the Manic Street Preachers - disappeared in 1995, describe their experiences. Listen

0821
A surprise hit of the Berlin Film Festival has been Iron Sky - a spoof based on the idea that the Nazis fled earth in 1945 to set up a colony on the far side of the moon, before returning to earth to seek domination once again in 2018. Professor of European studies at Oxford University Timothy Garton Ash and comedian Rainer Hersch discuss whether making light of Nazi's is part of Germany coming to terms with its history. Listen

0827
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0833

The Somali prime minister is in London ahead of an international conference to discuss the current political, humanitarian and security situations in Somalia. Prime Minister Abdiweli Mohamed Ali describes the challenges facing his country. Listen

0840
All the recent focus in the Eurozone has been on the crisis in Greece, but it is in Italy that the future of the single currency might be decided. Europe correspondent Chris Morris reports from Venice on the effect austerity measures are having on the iconic Italian location.

0845
Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd has resigned amid what looks like a power struggle with the woman who took over from him as prime minister, Julia Gillard. Read more

0848
Business news with Lesley Curwen.

0850
The country's first so-called "dirty lab" has been set up at the request of the government to help businesses in their battle against cyber-criminals. The BBC's Phil Mackie reports from inside the lab at Malvern in Worcestershire. Read more

0855
Government summits appear to be all the rage at the moment. Satirist Alistair Beaton and political editor of The Independent Andrew Grice discuss how valuable they actually are.




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