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Page last updated at 06:57 GMT, Monday, 21 November 2011
Today: Monday 21st November

Thousands of demonstrators across Egypt continue to protest against the country's current military rulers. The government is to set out its plans to stimulate the housing market in England. Also on today's programme, is a protest song the best way to inspire workers?

Business news with Simon Jack on the economic challenges facing Spain's new government.

President Assad is continuing to take a defiant stand in Syria in spite of pressure from the Arab League countries. James Harkin is one of the few journalists to have reported from Homs, the epicentre of the Syrian revolution and describes the atmosphere there.

Violent clashes are continuing between police and protestors in cities across Egypt as protestors demand that the governing military council return power to a civilian government. Hugh Sykes reports from Tahrir Square in Cairo and Dr Mamdouh Hamza, Secretary-General of The Egyptian National Council reflects on the protests.

The government's new housing strategy is being announced, aiming to kick-start house building, which has declined to a peacetime low in both the private and state sector. Sanchia Berg reports from Stevenage in Hertfordshire.

Business news with Simon Jack.

British Gas owner Centrica has signed a multi-billion pound gas supply deal with Norwegian company Statoil. Managing director of Centrica Energy Mark Hanafin explains the deal.

Sport news with Rob Bonnet.

The prime minister is to announce the government's housing strategy, which aims to make it easier for people to buy their own homes. Shadow chancellor Ed Balls gives his response to the housing strategy.

Airline passengers who need to use airports in parts of southern and eastern England this morning have been warned that their flights could be delayed because of dense fog. Andy Moore reports from Heathrow. BBC airport travel news

A review of the papers.

Beginning a sentence with the word "so" has become a regular occurrence in everyday conversation, and it has not been received entirely positively. John Rentoul of the Independent on Sunday, and author of The Banned List: A Manifesto Against Jargon and Cliche explains why he is not so impressed.

Thought for The Day with Rev Prof David Wilkinson.

There are fewer houses being built now than at any time since the war - something the government aims to tackle in its new housing strategy for England, which includes plans for £400m of subsidies to build new homes. Ray Boulger, of John Charcol Independent Mortgage Adviser's and John Stewart of the Homebuilders Federation discuss whether these government plans go far enough.

Egypt is seeing a new phase of uncertainty after clashes over the weekend between democracy protesters and the military. The BBC's Jon Leyne reports from Cairo on whether the Egyptian regime can be trusted and Foreign Secretary William Hague outlines Britain's response to the unrest.

A group of public sector workers from the TUC trade union have recorded the song Let's Work Together as part of the campaign against the government's pension reforms. Employment and Industry correspondent John Moylan reports on what they hope the song with achieve.

Sport news with Rob Bonnet.

The government will today outline proposals aimed at easing housing shortages and kick start the construction of thousand of new homes in England. Housing Minister Grant Shapps explains what the strategy hopes to achieve.

Business news with Simon Jack.

A high court judge has ruled that people should not be punished for using swear words in public, because swear words are now so common they no longer cause distress. Simon Reed of the Police Federation gives his reaction to the ruling.

Medical aid agency Medecins Sans Frontieres is celebrating its 40th anniversary with the launch a new book, recounting some of their biggest challenges in getting access to civilians in conflict zones. World affairs correspondent Mike Wooldridge reports.

According to the think tank Demos, compulsory volunteering should be introduced for those wanting to gain British citizenship. Author of the report, Max Wind-Cowie of Demos, and Telegraph columnist Charles Moore discuss what it is that makes us proud to be British.



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