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Page last updated at 07:27 GMT, Thursday, 20 January 2011
Today: Thursday 20th January

The government is launching a review of the primary and secondary school National Curriculum today, Schools Secretary Michael Gove outlines its aims. A Church of England bishop has called on Anglican clergy to take the Church's message to young people by trying to address the fundamental questions of life and death. Also in today's programme: is it better for society for young people to delay settling down?

To speed up the loading time for this running order, we have replaced the audio with links. To hear the reports, interviews and discussions, just click on the links.

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0615
Business news with Adam Shaw: Economist Sarah Hewin analyses the global impact of China's impressive economic growth. British Airways prepares for its last day of trading ahead of the merger with Spanish airline Iberia. And Adam goes on the trading floor with broker David Buik. Also in business, Richard Jeffrey reflects on the markets.

0709
GPs face losing control of the seasonal flu vaccine programme after this winter's problems. The government's head of immunisation, Professor David Salisbury, said there was a "pretty compelling" case for the it to order and supply jabs on behalf of local doctors. GP Richard Vautrey gives his reaction to Prof Salisbury's comments.

0714
The government is launching a review of the primary and secondary school National Curriculum today. The review will examine what core facts schools should be teaching, and what flexibility to give to teachers to set courses. Christine Blower, general secretary of the National Union of Teachers, outlines her view of the proposals.

0718
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0720
The government has banned Terry Jones, a controversial American pastor, from entering the UK on the grounds that his presence is "not conducive" to the public good. He was criticised last year for threatening to burn a copy of the Koran on the anniversary of the September the 11th attacks. Today presenter John Humphrys speaks to Mr Jones.

0723
Sport news with Garry Richardson.

0730
There was another marathon session overnight in the Lords as peers debated the bill which paves the way for a referendum on the voting system and changes the size and number of constituencies. BBC's Norman Smith review's the night's events and Lord Butler, former head of the Civil Service, analyses the meaning and outcome of this apparent filibustering.

0737
Paper review.

0730
All this week, Today is featuring the work of the poets shortlisted for this year's TS Eliot Prize. It is awarded to the author of the best new collection of poetry published in the UK and Ireland in the last year. Robin Robertson reads By Clachan Bridge.

0742
A Church of England bishop has called on Anglican clergy to take the Church's message to young people by trying to address the fundamental questions of life and death. Dr Graham Kings, the Bishop of Sherborne, in Dorset, says a lack of religious knowledge is one of the causes of religious doubt. Robert Pigott reports.

0747
Thought for the Day with the writer Rhidian Brook.

0750
A review of the National Curriculum begins today. The review will look at what core facts schools should be teaching, and what flexibility to give to teachers to set courses. Education Secretary Michael Gove explains what the review hopes to accomplish.

0810
Almost four months after British forces withdrew from the town of Sangin in Afghanistan, both soldiers and Afghans are still being killed on the ground. The US Army says this is because it is taking the battle to the Taliban in a way the British did not. The BBC's Paul Wood has been embedded with a group of US Marine and reports from the front line and General Sir Richard Dannatt reflects on recent events.

0823
Far from being in a hurry to grow up, it seems today's young people are taking a much longer path into adulthood. That is according to a new book Not Quite Adults, which says trend for young adults not to leave home until much later in life, if at all, is not necessarily a bad thing for society. The book's author, Rick Settersten, outlines why.

0835
The BBC understands that ministers are preparing to abandon plans to give the right to vote to thousands of prisoners serving sentences of four years or less. Political editor Nick Robinson reports.

0833
Our understanding of the brain is growing with each passing year. Scientific advancements have given us vital insights into how they work, mapped and tweaked and The Royal Society is today publishing a report which gives an overview of where scientific research is. Two professors involved in the review - Manchester University's John Harris and the Open University's Steven Rose - outline the frontiers of current knowledge about the brain.

0839
In the wake of BP's deal with the Russians to drill for oil and gas, could the Arctic become a new environmental battleground? Explorer Bruce Parry, has recently travelled to the region and gives his thoughts on the situation.

0842
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0845
All this week on the Today programme, we are looking at the work of the ten finalists in the TS Eliot Prize for Poetry. You can see find out more about all the finalists here. Today we hear from poet Sam Willetts who reads his piece Now, Trick.

0847
Liverpool is launching a London "embassy" to promote the city's business. But could the extra publicity draw attention to some of the port's less attractive aspects? We hear from Sir Terry Leahy, outgoing boss of Tesco and a son of the city of Liverpool.

0854
The moral question of "curing" homosexuality has been raised following a counsellor who was secretly recorded trying to do just that to a patient by praying to God. The woman at the centre of the row, Leslie Pilkington, will appear before the British Association for Counselling over the allegations. The Christian Legal Centre's Andrea Williams and Professor Michael King from University College London give us their thoughts.




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