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Page last updated at 06:35 GMT, Thursday, 15 July 2010 07:35 UK
Today: Thursday 15th July

The Government is to propose that a special tax on graduates' income replaces university tuition fees in England. And BP has begun testing the new cap on its ruptured well in the Gulf of Mexico to see whether it can stop the oil leak.

To speed up the loading time for this running order, we have replaced the audio with links. To hear the reports, interviews and discussions, just click on the links.

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0615
JD Wetherspoon chairman Tim Martin explains why he thinks the euro is "a busted flush". Henry Dixon, fund manager at Matterley Asset Management, takes a look at the markets. And Cass Business School's Peter Hahn analyses the new pan-European banking watchdog, the EU Banking Authority.

0709
Angel Gurria, the Secretary General of the OECD, is in London to meet David Cameron and a number of ministers. The OECD's recent recommendations on the need to cut deficits and for the Bank of England to raise interest rates, have attracted much comment. Mr Gurria outlines the OECD's position.

0712
An analysis of the possible effects of budget cuts on the police service in England and Wales suggests that as many as 60,000 police officer and staff posts could go. The study was commissioned by Police Review magazine and conducted by the former Chief Constable of Gloucestershire, Tim Brian. He analyses the possible effect of cuts on front-line policing.

0716
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0721
The life of Dr Ashraf Marwan was surrounded by intrigue and mystery; as was his violent sudden death in London three years ago. The Egyptian billionaire, spy and suspected double agent died after falling from a balcony at his apartment. An inquest has recorded an open verdict. Andrew Hosken investigates the events leading Dr Marwan's death.

0727
Sports news with Jon Myners.

0734
A damning report has revealed that in the year before a Cambridgeshire man was killed by a foreign doctor, Daniel Ubani, two other patients working for the agency, Take Care Now, which employed Dr Ubani were given accidental overdoses in similar situations. The Care Quality Commission's Amanda Sherlock discusses the lessons from the of the agency's alleged failures.

0737
The paper review.

0740
The world's greatest golfers will today play their first round at The Open at St Andrews. But there is one record they will be hoping not break, Maurice Flitcroft's 49 over-par in 1976, the worst-ever score in the tournament. Author Scott Murray and the Guardian's golf correspondent Laurence Donegan discuss Mr Flitcroft's golfing "legacy".

0745
Thought for the day with Reverend Joel Edwards, the International Director of Micah Challenge.

0747
George Mitchell, the US peace envoy, is back in Jerusalem this morning to continue his attempt to arrange direct talks between Israelis and Palestinians. One of the biggest issues between the two sides is the future of Jerusalem. Middle East Editor Jeremy Bowen reports from East Jerusalem.

0752
How can universities be funded in the age of austerity? Business secretary Vince Cable discusses a proposed graduate tax for students ahead of his speech on higher education today.

0810
Peter Mandelson's political memoir hits the bookshops today. It presents a picture of a "dysfunctional" government, with far more attention on politicking than on policy, on argument rather than achievement. Lord Mandelson gives his first broadcast interview about his controversial book.

0828
A man convicted of being involved in the murder of the British aid worker Margaret Hassan was due to appear in court in Baghdad today at the start of a retrial. But Mrs Hassan's family said the man, Ali Lotfi Jassar, had gone missing in the Iraqi prison system. Correspondent Gabriel Gatehouse reports from Baghdad.

0829
Sports news with Jon Myners.

0834
One man's villain is another man's hero, which seems to be true in the case of Raoul Moat, the gunman who kept Northumbria Police at bay for a week. David Cameron told the Commons he was astonished that Moat had become some sort of hero, with thousands of fans on the social networking website, Facebook. Psychologist Dr Aric Sigman and Conservative MP Chris Heaton-Harris analyse the phenomenon surrounding Moat.

0845
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0848
The conductor Sir Charles McKerras has died. He was 84 and had been suffering from cancer. He had many strings to his bow: a noted authority on Mozart's operas, he was regarded as the man who perhaps did more than any to popularise the music of Janacek. Sir Charles's agent, Robert Rattray, reflects on the maestro's life.

0852
A study of more than 4,000 British Jews suggests that although most feel a strong affinity with Israel and strongly support its right to self-defence, a majority believe the country should swap territory for peace, and negotiate with Hamas. Rabbi Tony Bayfield and Jonathan Hoffman, vice chairman of the Zionist Federation, discuss the importance of Israel to British Jews.

0857
The life of Sarah Palin is to be the subject of a new book aimed at children aged nine-to-12. The unauthorised biography, entitled Speaking Up, hopes to inspire young readers. Songwriter Richard Stilgoe outlines the potential for political books to appeal to a younger audience.




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