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Page last updated at 07:47 GMT, Monday, 8 March 2010
Today: Monday 8th March

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Money intended to pay for respite breaks for voluntary carers in England has gone to other parts of the NHS, it has been claimed. And Kathryn Bigelow has become the first woman to win an Oscar for best director, for her film The Hurt Locker.

0709
Scores of people have been reported killed in suspected religious clashes near the central Nigerian city of Jos. Acting President Goodluck Jonathan has put security forces in central Nigeria on full alert. Robin Waudo, spokesman for the International Committee of the Red Cross in Nigeria, describes the violent religious clashes.

0712
The business news with Adam Shaw.

0715
The polls have closed in Iraq's general election which took place over the weekend, against a backdrop of bombings that killed at least 35 people. World affairs editor John Simpson reflects on the vote.

0718
Kathryn Bigelow has become the first woman to win Oscar for best director for her film The Hurt Locker which also won best picture at the 82nd Academy Awards. Rebecca Jones reports from the ceremony on this year's winners and losers.

0723
Civil servants across the country are set for a 48-hour strike beginning today in a row over redundancy pay. Courts, ports, Job Centres, benefit offices, tax centres and emergency police call centres will all be affected by the action. Mark Serwotka, general secretary of the Public and Commercial Services Union, discusses the dispute.

0726
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0734
Jon Venables, one of the killers of toddler James Bulger, must not be "prejudged" by speculation over allegations he faces, ministers have said. Venables, now 27, is back in jail after breaching the terms of his 2001 release in which he was given a new identity. The Sunday Mirror has alleged his recall to prison was linked to images of child abuse, but government ministers have refused to be drawn on these claims. Justice Secretary Jack Straw comments on the anonymity of criminals.

0737
Hitler Youth groups on cycling holidays to the UK became an increasing cause of concern for British security services, newly released archive files reveal. MI5 intelligence suggested that the cyclists were actually spies gathering information which would be useful in case of invasion. Sanchia Berg reports on the suspicions surrounding the Hitler Youth's activities.

0742
The paper review.

0744
Millions of pounds promised for respite breaks for carers has been diverted to plug NHS deficits, an investigation has found. Freedom of Information requests made by the charities Princess Royal Trust for Carers and Crossroads Care showed that just under a quarter of the £50m earmarked this year has been used for respite breaks. Gordon Conochie, policy officer for the Princess Royal Trust for Carers, and David Stout, director of the Primary Care Trust network at the NHS Confederation, debate the use of respite break funding.

0749
Thought for the day with Canon Dr Alan Billings.

0753
A technique for "washing out" the brains of premature babies who have suffered bleeding in the brain may help their survival, according to research published today in the Paediatrics journal. Researchers at the University of Bristol and North Bristol NHS Trust showed that removing blood and toxic fluid potentially harmful to infants born early, reduced the number of deaths and severe disabilities in a group of premature babies. Andrew Whitelaw, professor of Neonatal Medicine at Bristol University who has helped develop the technique, and Steven Walker-Cox, the father of premature baby who was given the treatment, discuss the benefits of the washing-out technique.

0810
Jon Venables, one of the killers of toddler James Bulger, must not be "prejudged" by speculation over allegations he faces, ministers have said. Venables, now 27, is back in jail after breaching the terms of his 2001 release in which he was given a new identity. The Sunday Mirror has alleged his recall to prison was linked to images of child abuse, but government ministers have refused to be drawn on these claims. Justice Secretary Jack Straw outlines the role that public interest plays in the case.

0820
Major social problems including crime, climate change and poverty that existing structures and policies have found impossible to crack are being tackled by social innovation, according to a new report by the Young Foundation. The think tank cites several examples including Freecycle, Food Coops and Complaints Choirs that is says governments must recognise as an alternative to traditional policies and structures. Mike Hurley, from the Complaints Choir of Birmingham, and Robin Murray, co-author of the Young Foundation's report, examines the rise of this social innovation.

0827
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0832
Funding promised for respite breaks for carers has been diverted to plug NHS deficits, an investigation has found. Freedom of Information requests made by the charities Princess Royal Trust for Carers and Crossroads Care showed that very little is being spent on respite care. Care services minister Phil Hope reacts to the accusations.

0838
Thousands of small-scale hydroelectric schemes could power homes without damaging wildlife in rivers, according to an Environment Agency study published today. The agency mapped the energy hotspots of English and Welsh rivers and identified almost 26,000 locations where turbines could be installed to generate electricity from the water. Tony Grayling, head of climate change at the Environment Agency, and Mark Lloyd, chief executive of the Angling Trust, debate the benefits of the scheme.

0843
The business news with Adam Shaw.

0846
Investigations are continuing into why two men and a woman apparently jumped from the 15th floor of a block of flats in Glasgow yesterday. Correspondent Huw Williams reports on the latest in the investigation.

0848
The manipulative, the acquisitive, the dumb, the sexy - a special exhibition on the history of blondes in movies is being held at the British Film Institute, London. Laura Mulvey, professor of film and media studies at Birkbeck College, looks back on the role of Hollywood's blonde leading ladies.

0854
Described by Mountbatten as a vain and evil genius, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, has long been demonised in India as the man responsible for the partition of 1947, the historic event that Gandhi described as the "vivisection of the subcontinent". But a new book, India - Jinnah-Independence, presents a different view of Jinnah as committed to the idea of a united India, but that Nehru and Gandhi drove him away. William Dalrymple, the writer and historian who has lived in India for 25 years, and the book's Jaswant Singh, reflect on Jinnah's reputation.




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