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Page last updated at 07:27 GMT, Friday, 15 January 2010
Today: Friday 15th January

PLEASE NOTE: We are unable to offer transcripts for our programme interviews. Today is broadcast live and the running order is subject to change.

There is growing anger in Haiti at the slow pace of the earthquake relief operation. And 900 jobs will be lost after car-parts manufacturer Bosch said it would close its factory near Cardiff.

0709

A national appeal for aid for the victims of the Haiti earthquake is to be launched this morning. Up to three million people live in the area worst hit by the quake. Brendan Gormley, director of the disasters emergency committee (DEC) discusses the relief effort.

You can make a donation to the DEC Haiti appeal here .

0713

Mobile provider O2 is struggling to cope with the technological demands of the iPhone. The surging popularity of downloading video clips, surfing the internet and loading applications is causing outages and problems for users. Technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones outlines the iPhone's growing popularity, and Peter Cochrane, former chief technology officer at BT and chief executive officer of Cochrane Associates, discusses how network providers are trying to cope with the demand.

0719
Business news with Nick Cosgrove.

0722

The first presidential election since the Orange Revolution is to take place in the Ukraine this weekend. Five years ago the results of a fraudulent poll were overturned by mass street protests, in what was seen as a victory for freedom and democracy over control from Moscow. But many are now disappointed with the results of the Orange Revolution. Gabriel Gatehouse reports from Kiev.

0729
The sports news with Arlo White.

0733

David Cameron is to announce his party's security strategy at Chatham House today. In a policy overhaul, the Tories say they will move away from conflict intervention towards conflict prevention. The report's author, shadow security minister Baroness Neville-Jones, discuses the new approach.

0738

The shortlist for the TS Eliot award, the UK's most prestigious prize in poetry, has been announced. Inaugurated in 1993 to celebrate the Poetry Book Society's 40th birthday and honour its founding poet, the award comes with a £15,000 cash prize, the largest in British poetry. This year the Today programme will play one poem written and read by each of the ten shortlisted poets.

Christopher Reid reads a poem from his collection, A Scattering.

0740
The paper review.

0743

Frustration is mounting amongst the survivors of the earthquake in Haiti, as people who are venturing out into the streets have to face the sight of scores of dead bodies. In one part of Port-au-Prince, angry residents have set up roadblocks with the corpses to protest at the delay in emergency aid reaching them. Shaul Schwarz, a photographer for TIME magazine, was an eyewitness.

0745

The first day of the salmon fishing season on the River Tay begins today. But fishermen are being urged to throw back everything they catch because of declining salmon numbers. James Cook reports from the River Tay.

0748
Thought for the day with Reverend Dr Giles Fraser, Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral.

0751

Should the UK follow the US in imposing a levy on banks? President Obama has introduced the tax to recoup money US taxpayers are expected to lose from bailing out the banks during the financial crisis. Vince Cable, Liberal Democrat treasury spokesman, and Terry Smith, chief executive officer of money brokers Tullett Prebon, debate whether a bank levy could work in the UK.

0810

Aid arriving in Haiti is struggling to get through to those who need it, leading to growing unrest. Matthew Price reports from the capital, Port-au-Prince where unrest is growing over the lack of food and medical supplies. Lord Mark Malloch-Brown, former United Nations Deputy Secretary-General, discusses how the aid effort is being organised.

0820

The shortlist for the TS Eliot award, the UK's most prestigious prize in poetry, has been announced. Inaugurated in 1993 to celebrate the Poetry Book Society's 40th birthday and honour its founding poet, the award comes with a £15,000 cash prize, the largest in British poetry. To mark the awards, the Today programme is playing extracts of the shortlisted poets reading their own works.

Hugo Williams reads a poem from his collection, West End Final.

0821

As the great thaw descends on the country, the London Ice Sculpting Festival begins. Five national teams will compete against each other in carving two-metre blocks of ice. Philip Hughes, managing director of the Ice Box, demonstrates how to make an ice sculpture.

0825
The sports news with Arlo White.

0831

Surgeons from the UK are travelling to Haiti to help set up emergency medical support. Richard Villar, an orthopaedic surgeon, discusses the role of emergency response units.

0836

The Today programme has been receiving regular reports of life on the frontline in Afghanistan from Major Richard Streatfeild who is serving in Helmand province with The Rifles. In his latest despatch, Major Streatfeild welcomes the arrival of US troops on his patch and says the locals have started telling them where the Taliban have planted their bombs.

0838
Business news with Nick Cosgrove.

0842

Patients should be weighed each time they are prescribed antibiotics, according to new research. Doses of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents should take into account the patient's bodyweight, to maximise their potential effectiveness. Matthew Falagas, director of the Alfa Institute of Biomedical Science in Athens which carried out the research, explains the findings.

0845

The winner of this year's TS Eliot Prize for poetry will be announced on 18 January. The award, the UK's most prestigious prize in poetry, honours the author of the best new collection of poetry published in the UK and Ireland in the last year. To mark the awards, the Today programme is playing extracts of the shortlisted poets reading their own works.

Eiléan Ní Chuilleánain reads a poem from her collection, The Sun-fish Gallery.

0847

Cities on stilts and mass evacuations in cities like Hull and Portsmouth are among the ideas proposed in a report from the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). Alex Schofield, who helped produce the report, outlines its recommendations.

0850

Earlier in the programme, ice sculptor Philip Hughes described the art of carving ice and has spent the last half sculpting. Mr Hughes reveals his work.

0853

Haiti's 7.0 magnitude quake was the worst the country has seen in two centuries and a series of aftershocks continue to disturb rescue workers still sifting through the devastation. Professor Roger Searle from the Earth Sciences department at Durham University discuses whether earthquakes and aftershocks can be predicted.




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