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Page last updated at 06:19 GMT, Friday, 2 October 2009 07:19 UK
Today: Friday 2 October 2009

PLEASE NOTE: We are unable to offer transcripts for our programme interviews. Today is broadcast live and the running order is subject to change.

The health care regulator in England says lives are at risk because of the way GPs provide out of hours service. Ireland goes to the polls today in the country's second referendum on the European Union's Lisbon Treaty. And the children forced to emigrate to Australia demand an apology from the British government.

0709

The Care Quality Commission says lives are being put at risk because of the way GPs in England provide service outside normal working hours. Cynthia Bower, the Care Quality Commission's chief executive, and Dr Steve Field, chairman of the Royal College of GPs, analyse what needs to be done to change the system.

0714

Twenty primary schools are being named and praised by Ofsted because of their success in being turned around from failing schools to succeeding ones. David Kirk, headmaster of The Care Quality Commission says lives are being put at risk because of the way GPs in England provide service outside normal working hours. Cynthia Bower, the Care Quality Commission's chief executive, and Dr Steve Field, chairman of the Royal College of GPs, analyse what needs to be done to change the system. school in Halifax, one of the 20 named schools, explains what has made the difference.

0720
The business news with Nick Cosgrove.

0724

More than 200 healthcare workers who will soon be joining the Army in Afghanistan are going through their final stages of training. Health correspondent Adam Brimelow reports from the warehouse near York that has been adapted to create the conditions they will encounter at Camp Bastion in Helmand province.

0727
The sports news with Arlo White.

0731

Is internet helping paedophiles? It was the internet that enabled Vanessa George to operate a paedophile ring while she was working at a nursery in Plymouth. And it was the internet that led to her arrest, after a vigilant colleague of the man convicted with her spotted something on his computer and told the police. Dr Bernie Hogan of the Oxford Internet Institute, who has done extensive research into social networking sites, and Home Affairs editor Mark Easton, analyse the impact of the age of the internet.

0737

Ireland goes to the polls today in the country's second referendum on the Lisbon Treaty. The political fate of half a billion people is in their hands. The Treaty, if it eventually passes, would streamline decision making in the European Union and create the post of president of Europe and has been ratified in every other member state. Europe editor Gavin Hewitt reports from Dublin on the likely outcome of the vote.

0740
Today's papers.

0743

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson has made a cameo on TV soap EastEnders. Times television critic Andrew Billen rates his performance.

0747
Thought for the day with The Chief Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks.

0750

The death toll from the earthquake in Indonesia already stands at more than 1,000, according to the UN, and officials say they expect it to rise. Many people are thought to be trapped in buildings devastated by the tremors. Rachel Harvey reports from the region and International Development secretary Douglas Alexander discusses Britain's response.

0810

The son of a man who died after being given a lethal dose of painkiller by a doctor flown in from Germany to provide weekend cover has called for vetting procedures to be tightened. The comments by Dr Stuart Gray, whose father David died in February 2008, follow the publication of an interim report into out-of-hours GP care by a health watchdog which found primary care trusts may be failing to spot patient safety issues because of a lack of scrutiny.

0820

Parents at Little Teds nursery in Plymouth want to know which of their children were involved in the images shared by Vanessa George, Colin Blanchard and Angela Allen. Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) chief executive Jim Gamble discusses what is being done to track down paedophiles on the internet.

0824

In the run up to the winner of the Man Booker prize for fiction being announced, the Today programme is speaking to all six shortlisted authors. Arts correspondent Rebecca Jones profiles JM Coetzee's novel, Summertime.

0827
The sports news with Arlo White.

0830

Natalie Morton, the 14-year-old who died after receiving a cervical cancer vaccination, was not killed by the vaccination, an inquest has found, but by an undiagnosed lung tumour. But the news stories reporting that fact are fewer and smaller than those that raised the spectre of the vaccination being unsafe. GP Richard Halvorsen, author of The Truth About Vaccines, and Professor Adam Finn, of Bristol University, discuss the media's reporting of the risks of vaccination.

0837
The business news with Nick Cosgrove.

0841

The First Minister of Wales Rhodri Morgan has announced his retirement at the age of 70. Mr Morgan discusses why he decided to bow out of politics at the time of his choosing.

0845

An ancient human-like creature that may be a direct ancestor to our species has been described by researchers. The assessment of the 4.4-million-year-old animal called Ardipithecus ramidus is reported in the journal Science and is already causing controversy. Steve Jones, professor of Genetics at University College London, discusses the findings.

0850

Documents at the National Archives show the Home Office was warned as early as 1947 against sending child migrants to Australia. Up to 10,000 children were sent to Australia between 1922 and 1967 to boost the white population and the workforce. Many were abused. Sanchia Berg reports on their calls for an apology from the British government.

0855

The host of the 2016 Olympic games will be announced in Copenhagen today, and Barack Obama will be there personally to support Chicago's bid, together with his wife, and even Oprah Winfrey. The International Olympic Committee must decide between Chicago, Rio, Madrid and Tokyo. Stefan Szymanski, professor of Economics at Cass business school at City University London looks into the options.




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