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Page last updated at 06:32 GMT, Monday, 31 August 2009 07:32 UK
Today: Monday 31 August 2009

PLEASE NOTE: We are unable to offer transcripts for our programme interviews. Today is broadcast live and the running order is subject to change.

Japan's next leader, Yukio Hatoyama, is beginning a transition to power after winning a landmark general election. Researchers have claimed the food provided in prisons is better than in NHS hospitals. And people in England and Wales who commit crimes or behave anti-socially while drunk could now face a Drinking Banning Order.

0709

Justice Secretary Jack Straw has insisted that there is no link between the release of convicted terrorist Abdelbaset al-Megrahi and Britain's commercial interests with Libya. David Willey reports on Italian PM Silvio Berlusconi's visit to Libya to celebrate the anniversary of a friendship pact. Oliver Miles, deputy chairman of the Libyan British Business Council, discusses trade agreements between the UK and Libya.

0713

Japan's new prime minister, Yukio Hatoyama, is beginning a transition to power after winning a landmark general election. Correspondent Roland Buerk reports on the result of the polls, which are expected to show almost an exact reversal of their previous standing.

0717

What happens if a large asteroid threatens devastation as it careers towards earth? Dr Ralph Cordey, of the space company Astrium, discusses the development of a spaceship that could shadow an asteroid and divert it off course.

0720
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0723

Researchers have claimed the food provided in prisons is better than in NHS hospitals. Professor John Edwards, the man who conducted the survey, discusses whether patients are satisfied with the food they receive in hospitals.

0726
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0733

Much of Kenya is in the grip of the worst drought in a decade. According to the UN, which has appealed for more than £140m to provide emergency food aid, nearly 4m people need help. So far, human casualties are thought to be low but malnutrition rates are climbing and many thousands of animals have died. Correspondent Mike Thomson reports from a parched area near the town of Garissa in north east Kenya.

0739

After 120 years, 100 watt bulbs are being phased out in favour of energy-saving ones. Matt Prescott, director of campaign group Ban the Bulb, examines new rules which means all traditional bulbs will be banned by 2012.

0742
Today's papers.

0745

What lies behind the name of your local pub? Author Albert Jack has been examining some of the more unusual names and explains where such titles as The Pickled Parson, The Bucket of Blood and The Swan With Two Necks come from.

0748
Thought for the day with Rabbi Lionel Blue.

0751

People in England and Wales who commit crimes or behave anti-socially while drunk could now face a Drinking Banning Order - or "booze Asbo". John Thornhill, chairman of the Magistrates' Association, discusses the new powers allowing police and councils to seek an order on anyone aged 16 and over.

0810

Is negotiating with the Taliban the best strategy for Afghanistan? Colonel Richard Kemp, former commanding officer of 1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, and author James Fergusson discuss whether the current strategy is working.

0823

Chat show host Simon Dee, one of the biggest stars on British TV in the 1960s, has died at the age of 74. Journalist Ray Connolly, formerly of the London Evening Standard, remembers the man synonymous with the spirit of the Swinging Sixties.

0827
Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

0832

More and more is emerging about efforts made the British government made to secure the transfer to Libya of Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi. Nicola Sturgeon, deputy first minister of Scotland, examines whether the release of the Lockerbie bomber was linked to trade deals.

0840

In 2001, the law changed the way detectives handled police informants. No longer would individual officers handle their own sources of intelligence. Now there are tight guidelines and even specialised units and handlers to deal with them. Andrew Hosken reports on whether, as the Police Federation alleges, this bureaucracy is deterring some informants from stepping forward.

0844

Today programme listeners have been emailing in with their questions about the origins of the name of pubs. Author Albert Jack explains some of the names that have been causing confusion.

0848
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0851

The Kenyan government is facing some criticism about the drought affecting east Africa. Addison Chebukaka, Kenya's deputy high commissioner in London, reflects on whether his government could do more to manage the economy.

0853

Britain's only fully-fledged matador, 67-year-old Frank Evans from Salford, has made his latest comeback in southern Spain. Correspondent Steve Kingstone reports on the bullfighter who trained in Spain in the 1960s and retired in 2005.

0856

Exit polls show Yukio Hatoyama's Democratic Party of Japan has overwhelmingly defeated the Liberal Democratic Party in Japan's general election. Yukio Okamoto, former adviser to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Japan, and Bill Emmott, former editor of The Economist, discuss whether this is a "revolution" for the country.




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