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Page last updated at 06:11 GMT, Tuesday, 18 August 2009 07:11 UK
Today: Tuesday 18 August 2009

PLEASE NOTE: We are unable to offer transcripts for our programme interviews. Today is broadcast live and the running order is subject to change.

An investigation by the BBC has found evidence of fraud and corruption in Afghanistan's presidential election. Seven US senators have urged the Scottish justice secretary to keep Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi behind bars in Scotland. And plans to allow police to issue on-the-spot fines for careless driving would undermine justice, say magistrates.

0709

US prosecutors have charged a man with stealing data relating to 130 million credit and debit cards. Rupert Goodwins, editor of technology website and magazine ZDNet, discusses what whether more can be done to make online transactions safe.

0713

The Communications Workers Union (CWU) wants the government to intervene in its dispute with Royal Mail which has led to strike action. Billy Hayes, leader of the union, considers how the disagreement over cuts to jobs and services could be resolved.

0716

The men who carried out a £40m raid on a jewellery store in central London had planned to carry out the robbery two days earlier, police say. Julian Radcliffe, chairman of the Art Loss Register, explains what could have happened to the stolen diamonds.

0719
Business news with Nick Cosgrove.

0722

Prince Charles is facing criticism again after he unsuccessfully tried to intervene over plans for a modernist building next to St Paul's Cathedral. Reporter Paola Buonadonna visits Poundbury, an extension of Dorchester designed by the prince to encourage integrated housing, to discover whether local residents agree with Charles's idea of good architecture.

0726

A review of investigation and prosecution of wildlife crime has been called for by conservation charities. Ian West, the RSPB's head of investigations, discusses why only 51 convictions resulted from more than 3,500 reported UK incidents of wildlife crime in 2008.

0729
Sports news with Garry Richardson.

0736

Students starting university courses this autumn can expect to graduate owing £23,000, a survey suggests. Wes Streeting, president of the National Union of Students, and Nicholas Barr, of the London School of Economics, discuss whether the average debt of more than £5,000 per year is causing students financial hardship.

0742
Today's papers.

0745

Mathematical researchers from Canada have tried to model the epidemiology of a Zombie apocalypse in an attempt to understand the spread of infectious diseases. Epidemiologist Neil Ferguson, of Imperial College London, discusses whether there is a useful comparison between zombies and swine flu.

0749
Thought for the day with the novelist and columnist Anne Atkins.

0752

Seven US senators have urged the Scottish justice secretary to keep Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi behind bars in Scotland. Robert Baer, a former intelligence officer at the CIA, explains his doubts about the case against Megrahi. Sir Richard Dalton, a former British ambassador to Libya and Iran, discusses the fate of the Libyan man.

0810

An investigation by the BBC has found evidence of fraud and corruption in Afghanistan's presidential election. Correspondent Ian Pannell reports from Kabul on voting cards which have been offered for sale and the thousands of dollars offered in bribes to buy votes.

0816

Allowing police to issue on-the-spot fines for careless driving would undermine justice, magistrates say. John Thornhill, chairman of the Magistrates' Association, discusses why he believes that deciding driving is careless is a subjective judgement.

0823

New light has been shed on the early career of notorious spy Guy Burgess. Documents released from the BBC Archive tell of Burgess' life as a BBC producer and reporter before he was taken on by the Foreign Office. BBC historian Jean Seaton and biographer Andrew Lownie, discuss the fascination with the Cambridge spies.

0828
Sports news with Garry Richardson.

0832

A man charged with trying to buy arms and explosives for the dissident Irish republican organisation the Real IRA is facing trial in Lithuania. David McKittrick, of the Independent, explains the history of the Real IRA.

0840

Former Harlequins director of rugby Dean Richards has been banned from coaching for three years for his part in a fake blood injury controversy. Former England captain Will Carling, and sports writer Oliver Holt, of the Daily Mirror, discuss a year in rugby which has already included drug-allegations and eye-gouging.

0845
Business news with Nick Cosgrove.

0848

The Pakistani army is keeping up its campaign to drive the Taliban out of the Swat Valley. There have been sporadic outbursts of violence - a suicide bomber has wounded four soldiers and a bomb blast killed seven people, children among them. Reporter Zubeida Malik describes her correspondence with a teacher from Mingora who describes what life was like for her and other women under Taliban rule.

0853

Millions of housing association tenants may be asked to give up rent reductions because of financial pressures facing landlords, it is warned. Ruth Davison, director of the National Housing Federation, says even a small reduction in rental income could have a big impact on their programme for more social housing.

0855

Oxford Airport has been renamed London Oxford Airport despite being more than 60 miles from the centre of London. Simon Calder, travel editor of the Independent, discusses other examples of airports being not quite in the centre of the city they are named after.




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