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Memories of the 1969 Moon landing

To mark the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11 and man's first lunar landing, the Today programme asked various well-known figures what they remember of those momentous events in July 1969.

Mary QuantSir Patrick StewartLord ReesSir Robin Knox-JohnstonTony BennStephen Poliakoff

FASHION DESIGNER MARY QUANT

Mary Quant and her husband wired their television up outside so they could watch the Moon landing on it while also staring up to the sky. She describes the intense anticipation of this historic moment and the benefits people thought it would bring in the form of new inventions, new medicines and even perhaps the opportunity to travel "from one planet to another".

ACTOR SIR PATRICK STEWART

Sir Patrick Stewart, also known as Star Trek's Captain Jean-Luc Picard, says he would have taken the chance to go to the moon "like a shot". He says: "Nothing seemed to me to epitomise the excitement of the 20th Century more than the fact we had put men on the Moon."

ASTRONOMER ROYAL LORD MARTIN REES

Astronomer Royal Lord Rees refers to the Moon landing as an "exciting adventure" and remarks on how wonderful it was to see man's space drive going "from cornflakes packet to reality" within a decade.

SAILOR SIR WILLIAM ROBERT PATRICK 'ROBIN' KNOX-JOHNSTON

Sailor Sir William Robert Patrick 'Robin' Knox-Johnston - the first man to perform a single-handed non-stop circumnavigation of the globe - first heard about the planned missions to the Moon in 1968 when he was about a month short of Cape Horn.

TONY BENN

Minister of technology at the time, Tony Benn remarks: "It gave people a different perspective of the world in which we live and indeed the universe."

PLAYWRIGHT, DIRECTOR AND SCRIPTWRITER STEPHEN POLIAKOFF

For Stephen Poliakoff the landing was a moment of "light relief" because he was waiting for his A level results at the time. He describes it as "a truly extraordinary, awe-inspiring thing".




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