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Page last updated at 06:04 GMT, Wednesday, 15 July 2009 07:04 UK
Today: Wednesday 15 July 2009

PLEASE NOTE: We are unable to offer transcripts for our programme interviews. Today is broadcast live and the running order is subject to change.

A fifth of English local authorities are reporting increased pressure on school places due to the recession, the Local Government Association says. And the government must map the spread of swine flu more accurately in order to predict the number of people who are likely to die from it, scientists say.

0709

The government must map the spread of swine flu more accurately in order to predict the number of people who are likely to die from it, scientists say. Sir Liam Donaldson, chief medical officer of England, discusses whether the illness could, as researchers at Imperial College predict, kill one in 200 people who get ill enough to need medical help.

0714
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0717

A 19-year-old British backpacker missing in Australia for 12 days has been found alive. Correspondent Nick Bryant reports on Jamie Neale, from Muswell Hill, north London, who went missing in dense bushland in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney.

0721

A huge expansion of wind power, home insulation and "smart" electricity meters are among measures being planned to build the UK's low-carbon future. Environment correspondent Sarah Mukherjee reports from Ashton Hayes in Cheshire, which is trying to become England's first carbon neutral village.

0724

A by-election in Norwich North is to take place - prompted by the resignation of Labour MP Ian Gibson. Correspondent Norman Smith reports on how significant the result could be in gauging wider voting patterns before the general election.

0728
Sports news with Garry Richardson.

0734

Has the flow of steadily worsening economic forecasts dried up? Financial Times journalist Martin Wolf and Jim O'Neil, chief economist at Goldman Sachs, discuss if the pattern of the UK economy echoes the Great Depression of the 1930s.

0741
Today's papers.

0744

At the turn of the 20th Century the Metropolitan Railway Company developed land along its route into one of London's first suburbs, calling it "Metro-land". Nicola Stanbridge reports on how one council on the Metropolitan line is trying to protect its slice of Metro-land for posterity.

0748
Thought for the day with The Right Reverend James Jones, Bishop of Liverpool.

0751

The government is to publish a Carbon Transition Plan, hoped to help them meet 2020 targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions. Environment Secretary Ed Miliband considers whether the UK can adapt to a low-carbon economy.

0810

A fifth of English local authorities are reporting increased pressure on school places due to the recession, the Local Government Association (LGA) says. Sanchia Berg reports on how one London borough is catering for the increased demand. Margaret Eaton, chairman of the LGA, considers if the economic climate is forcing some parents to abandon private education.

0819

The BBC Trust is considering calls for Thought for the Day to include non-religious speakers. Christina Rees, a member of the Church of England's General Synod, and AC Grayling, a philosopher and atheist, discuss the future of Thought.

0825

Britain's armed forces have more than 500 helicopters, but fewer than 30 are being used in Afghanistan. Head of the Army General Sir Richard Dannatt, who has been flying with Today presenter Sarah Montague in a US helicopter, says if he moves in an American helicopter it is because he does not have a British one.

0828
Sports news with Garry Richardson.

0833

"The only teenager in the world who goes on a 10-mile hike and leaves his mobile phone behind" has been found alive after 12 days missing in Australia. The father of 19-year-old Jamie Neale explains how he felt when he heard the news his son was alive.

0838

Human rights arguments against extraditing a British man accused of hacking into US military networks were not "confronted", a court has heard. Shadow home secretary Chris Grayling discusses the extradition process in UK courts.

0840
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0844

Top surgeon Lord Darzi, one of several non-political figures brought into Gordon Brown's government, is to resign as health minister. Political writer Anthony Howard remembers previous examples of non-political figures in government.

0849

What has caused the increased pressure on school places? Mick Brookes, general secretary of the National Association of Headteachers, and Julian Le Grand, professor of social policy at the London School of Economics, discuss the possibilities.

0854

Do psychiatric drugs work? Dr Joanna Moncrieff, of the department of mental health sciences at University College London, says they actually put people into "drug-induced states". She discusses whether drug treatments work in psychiatry with consultant psychiatrist Trevor Turner.




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