• News Feeds
Page last updated at 07:46 GMT, Friday, 20 March 2009
Today: Friday 20 March 2009

PLEASE NOTE: We are unable to offer transcripts for our programme interviews. Today is broadcast live and the running order is subject to change.

Former Labour health secretary Patricia Hewitt has tabled an amendment to the Coroner's and Justice Bill that would allow people to escort a terminally ill person abroad to die without facing prosecution. Over 100 people in the UK have travelled abroad to die, and currently the maximum penalty for assisting them is 14 years in prison. However, although there have been police investigations, nobody has ever been successfully prosecuted.

0709

Former Labour health secretary Patricia Hewitt explains her reasons for proposing amendments to the law regarding assisted suicides.

0712

The NHS database would provide online records for up to 50 million patients, but the project could be "fatally undermined" by a number of GPs who feel there is no way to ensure patient confidentiality. Andrew Hosken reports.

0720
Business news with Nick Cosgrove

0723

The government has decided to provide support for veterans to participate in this year's D Day commemorations in France. Ed Slater, chairman of the Normandy Veteran Association, explains how significant the trip is for veterans.

0725

The National Audit Office has released a report that reveals Northern Rock was allowed to lend £800m in high risk mortgages for six months after it was nationalised. Business editor Robert Peston examines how this could have happened.

0728
Sports news with Jon Myers.

0730

A report by think tank the New Local Government Network criticises the level of public access to dentistry. The report found that almost a fifth of NHS patients have gone without treatment because of cost. Chris Leslie, the director of the NLGN, and Derek Watson, chief executive of the Dental Practitioners Association, discuss the future of dentistry in the UK.

0735
Today's papers.

0740

President Barack Obama has appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, an "American institution". He is the first sitting president to have done so. North America Editor Justin Webb reports.

0748
Thought for the day with Sir Jonathan Sacks.

0750

President Obama is to receive a review of US policy on Afghanistan from a former CIA officer. The review is expected to provide ways for the allies to offer considerably more civilian and military help, without having to provide many more troops. Correspondent Ian Pannell describes the present situation in Afghanistan from Kabul, and Foreign Secretary David Miliband discusses the policy changes that are needed.

0810

Former Labour health secretary Patricia Hewitt has tabled an amendment to the Coroner's and Justice Bill that would allow people to escort a terminally ill person abroad to die without facing prosecution. Over 100 people in the UK have travelled abroad to die, and although there have been police investigations, nobody has ever been prosecuted. Lesley Close, who accompanied her brother John to the Dignitas clinic in Switzerland, and Lord Carlile, Liberal Democrat peer, discuss the political, legal and moral implications of such an amendment to the law.

0820

There has been an upsurge in the popularity of Chinese philosopher Confucius, with schools minister Jim Knight suggesting exam results could be improved if pupils studied his teachings. Correspondent James Reynolds and expert in Chinese studies at Edinburgh University Professor Joachim Gentz explain the sudden interest.

0826
Sports news with Jon Myers.

0830

The Healthcare Commission has released a report on Birmingham Children's Hospital, which reveals a "catalogue of failings" including delays in treatment and bed shortages. Dr Charlie Ralston, the medical director at the hospital, explains how these problems came about.

0840
Business news with Nick Cosgrove

0844

The UK's anti-terrorism strategy, known as Contest, is to be relaunched with greater emphasis placed on prevention through addressing the ideologies that lead to extremism. Correspondent Rory Maclean examines the potential complications of such an approach.

0847

The NHS database, which would provide online records for up to 50 million patients at a cost of £7bn, will be up and running by 2010 according to the government. GPs have expressed concern about the confidentiality of patients' medical details, and the government have decided to allow people to opt out via an online form or by post. Dr Gillian Braunold, the clinical director in the NHS responsible for the database, explains how it will benefit patients.

0850

Philosopher Slavoj Zizek spoke at a symposium entitled On the Idea of Communism, attended by over 900 people at Birkbeck University in London. Presenter Evan Davis also attended and asked him for his take on the current economic crisis.

0855

Documents revealing the thoughts of the main British prosecutor, David Maxwell Fyfe, at the Nuremberg Nazi war crimes trials have been opened to the public. Tom Blackmore, Mr Maxwell Fyfe's grandson who found the letters, and Allen Packwood, from the Churchill Archives Centre, examine what the letters tell us about the trials.




RELATED BBC LINKS

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific