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Page last updated at 07:39 GMT, Monday, 9 March 2009
Today: Monday 9 March 2009

PLEASE NOTE: We are unable to offer transcripts for our programme interviews. Today is broadcast live and the running order is subject to change.

Security is stepped up in Northern Ireland as police search for the gunmen who killed two soldiers at an Army barracks. And Nato's commander in Afghanistan says the coalition is failing in large parts of the south.

0709
An independent investigation is to be launched into the way police handled the case of a 24-year-old woman stabbed to death by her former partner. The inquiry comes as ministers announce a cross-government consultation to tackle violence against women. Nick Hardwick, chairman of the Independent Police Complaints Commission, discusses the difficulties posed by cases of this kind.

0712
The dissident Republican group the Real IRA appears to be claiming responsibility for killing two soldiers and injuring four other people outside an Army barracks in Northern Ireland. Democratic Unionist MP Jeffrey Donaldson talks about the implications of these attacks.

0716
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0718
The latest allegations made by the former Guantanamo Bay detainee Binyam Mohamed claim that the British government cooperated with the US in torturing him. Manfred Nowak, United Nations special rapporteur on torture, discusses whether a full inquiry should be launched into the case.

0720
Councils are spending 500m a year clearing up litter, a report from the think tank Policy Exchange reports. Reporter Sarah Mukherjee talks to a local councillor in Southampton which is nationally recognised as a clean city.

0724
Sports news with Garry Richardson.

0731
The commander of American and Nato forces in southern Afghanistan says that the coalition is not winning in large areas of the south of the country. Security Correspondent Gordon Corera talks about the situation on the ground from Kabul.

0740
The stock market in Japan has fallen to its lowest level since October 1982, a reflection of the difficulties facing its economy. What is needed is a huge boost in demand - or in the words of President Obama's top economic adviser Larry Summers: "There's a need for extraordinary public action." Economics editor Stephanie Flanders explains how governments are responding.

0741
Today's papers.

0744
President of the Magic Circle and famous TV magician Ali Bongo has died aged 79 after suffering a stroke. Ali spent most of his career in television behind the scenes devising routines for performers such as David Nixon and Paul Daniels. Acting president of the Magic Circle, Jack Delvin talks about his friend's legacy.

0747
Thought for the day with Reverend Joel Edwards

0750
The head of a school in North Tyneside is considering starting lessons at 11am due to new research which shows teenagers' brains work better in the afternoon. Russell Foster, the neuroscientist who performed the tests, and general secretary of the teachers union NASUWT Chris Keates discuss whether timetables should be redesigned to help teenagers learn.

0810
The Real IRA has reportedly claimed responsibility for killing two soldiers and injuring four other people outside an army barracks in Northern Ireland. Gerry Adams, the leader of Sinn Fein, discusses what the attack will mean for the future of the peace process.

0820
An auditorium unearthed by archaeologists in East London is thought to be the site where Shakespeare's early plays had their debut. Reporter Nicola Stanbridge talks to the archaeologists about the latest plans.

0824
Sports news with Garry Richardson.

0830
The coalition is not winning in large areas of south Afghanistan, the commander of American and Nato forces in the area has said. Security correspondent Gordon Corera talks to General David McKiernan about why British troops are failing to have an affect in the area.

0835
Business news with Adam Shaw.

0840
The Department for International Development is holding a conference to look at how poorer countries can be helped to cope with the impacts of the current global economic downturn and climate change. Lord Stern, author of the Stern Review and speaker at the conference, discusses whether the conclusions he drew in 2006 still hold sway in the current global recession.

0845
A debate is raging between hunters and animal rights campaigners as to whether a rare white deer native to the Kirkconnel estate in Scotland should be shot owing to a genetic defect. The white coated roebuck deer has a genetic defect which could damage the gene pool of the domestic species. Will Travers, chief executive of the Born Free Foundation, and Charlie Jacoby, editor of the magazine Sporting Rifle, discuss whether the deer should be kept alive.

0850
The modern Commonwealth is marking its 60th anniversary this year but a new survey suggests young people in Britain are increasingly apathetic towards the organisation. World affairs correspondent Mike Wooldridge talks to Kenyan villagers involved in Commonwealth charity programmes.

0854
A new report by the think tank Policy Exchange is calling for a re-evaluation of how we manage litter. The report suggests that litter clear up is costing councils 500m a year. Bill Bryson, president of the Campaign to Protect Rural England, discusses how to deal with the problem.

0856
Responsibility has been claimed for the attacks at an army barracks in Northern Ireland. The dissident Republican group the Real IRA has admitted to being behind the killing of two soldiers and the injuring of four other people. Panorama reporter Peter Taylor and security correspondent Frank Gardner discuss whether the Real IRA poses a serious threat to security in the region.




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