bbc.co.uk
Home
TV
Radio
Talk
Where I Live
A-Z Index
BBC Sport Academy
GAMES CHAT PHOTOS QUIZ WIN
BBC Sport You are in: Other Sport: Snooker  

Homepage
Other Sport
Badminton
Boxing
Cycling
Gaelic Sports
Gymnastics
Judo
Olympic Sports
Paralympics
Rowing
Skateboarding
Snooker
Winter Sport



Latest Sports News
CBBC
Academy Parent

Get the newsletter
Learn to control the cue ball
Around the Academy:

Learn how to control the cue ball with the Academy's guide to spin.
The most important ball on the snooker table is the White.

It's the only one you strike with your cue and your ability to control it determines whether you'll win frames or appear on You've Been Framed.

It's not just about making the pot, you have to plan ahead and manoeuvre the cue-ball accurately.

Whether you're building a break or playing safe, you need to be a master of spin - and the Academy's here to show you how.


SCREW AND STUN:
This is the most common form of spin used by players. It is achieved by striking the lower half of the cue ball.

You can stop the cue ball dead by hitting just below centre, but if it's more backspin you're after, strike the ball lower.

Jimmy White is the master of the screw shot
Jimmy: Master of the screw shot

Be careful not to strike too low or the cue-ball will jump, and if you really overdo it, you may even end up ripping the cloth!

As for direction, screw back in a straight line by hitting the bottom centre of the ball.

Strike the lower sides of the cue ball to send the ball left or right after impact.

SIDE SPIN:
Probably the hardest technique to employ successfully - even experienced professionals have difficulty judging side spin.

Achieved by striking left or right of the centre of the cue-ball, this form of spin affects how the white ball travels towards the object ball.

If the left hand side is struck, the white will move right of centre - and vice versa.

Once perfected, this skill can even be used to swerve out of a snooker!

TOP SPIN:
Striking the upper part of the cue ball causes it to travel further after impact with the object ball.

It is helpful to raise your bridge hand when playing this shot.

This will steady your aim and enables greater accuracy when striking above the centre of the white ball.

Players use this shot frequently, particularly when attempting to open a pack of reds.

As ever the amount of spin is determined by two things - how hard you hit the cue ball, and the distance between the cue ball and the object ball.


Back to top




FROM THE BBC >>
:: BBC Sport's snooker news

SNOOKER ::

The world's best snooker player shows you how it's done! Ronnie's top tips for you!

::

Grip

::

Stance

::

Bridging

::

Cueing

::

Sighting

::

Get involved!

SNOOKER ::
Get pots of snooker advice from Mark Williams
Pots of advice from Mark Williams


^^ Back to top
© BBC Contact us | Help | About us Disclaimer
Football  |  Cricket  |  Tennis  |  Golf  |  Rugby Union  |  Rugby League  |  Athletics  |  Basketball  |  Swimming
Other Sport  |  In the Gym  |  Healthy Eating  |  Treatment Room  |  Your Blueprint  |  Learning Centre