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What is the track time trial all about?
Around the Academy:

Britain's Chris Hoy rides to Olympic glory in Athens

This an individual race against the clock from a standing start.

It is probably the most painful of all the track events.

The race takes place over 1km (that is four laps of the track) for men and 500m (two laps) for women.

The 'kilo,' as it is commonly known, requires the rider to have an explosive start, devastating speed and superhuman strength and stamina.

The rider must also be able to judge their pace so he or she doesn't run out of steam at a crucial point of the race.

But every single part of the race is crucial because the medals will be decided by a fraction of a second!

Chris Hoy emulated Jason Queally by winning the gold medal in Athens
Britain's Chris Hoy grabbed gold in Athens

And there's no second chance, so you've got to nail it first time.

The start must be smooth but explosive - time lost coming out of the starting gate means time is lost at the other end.

If the rider tries to make it up too quickly they could go into oxygen debt.

This is where the lactic acid build-up in your legs becomes almost unbearably painful.

It is a spectacular event and calls for duelling of the highest calibre - particularly as there is only one chance!


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The history
Individual sprint
Track time trial
Individual pursuit
Team pursuit
Olympic sprint
Points race
Madison
Keirin

Did you know?
If we take strenuous exercise, our muscles need extra oxygen. But we can't breathe fast enough, nor pump our blood sufficiently quickly to get oxygen to our muscles. So our muscles produce energy by making lactic acid. It is a mild poison and can make your muscles ache (cramp). During a race the lactic acid can build up and so it has to be got rid-of after the race. This is done by panting to get more oxygen into the body and so converting the lactic acid into carbon dioxide and water. The extra oxygen needed to get rid of the lactic acid is called the oxygen debt.



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