bbc.co.uk
Home
TV
Radio
Talk
Where I Live
A-Z Index
BBC Sport Academy
GAMES CHAT PHOTOS QUIZ WIN
BBC Sport You are in: In the Gym: Jargon Guide  

Homepage
In the Gym
Exercises
Workouts
Features
Jargon Guide



Latest Sports News
CBBC
Academy Parent

Get the newsletter
In the gym jargon guide
Around the Academy:

If you want to know the difference between aerobic and anaerobic training you've come to the right place.

In possibly our most strenuous jargon guide, we talk you through all you need to know from A - W!


ABDOMINAL MUSCLES
These are the muscles in your stomach. If someone has a well developed mid-region they are said to have a "six-pack".


AEROBIC TRAINING
Training which requires plenty of oxygen. It works your body's muscles which increases your heart rate and strengthens the heart and lungs.


ANAEROBIC TRAINING
Training which uses movements which require very little oxygen. These are quick explosive actions which last a short space of time such as sprinting.


AGILITY
The power of moving the limbs quickly and easily; nimbleness; activity; quickness of motion; as, strength and agility of body.


CARDIOVASCULAR TRAINING
Training, such as aerobics, running or cycling, that strengthens the heart and the blood vessels and helps to build up your general fitness.


COOL DOWN
A form of light training or stretching which allows your body to gradually slow down after exercise.


LACTIC ACID
A liquid which is produced in muscles as a result of anaerobic training. It slows down the body if it builds up too much.


PECTORAL MUSCLES
The muscles in your chest which allow you to push your arms forward. Familiarly called the pecs.


SET
A fixed number of repetitions. For example, eight repetitions of a bicep or tricep curl may make one set.


TRAPEZIUS MUSCLES
These are the largest muscles in the back and neck that draw the head backwards and rotate the scapula.


V02 MAX
The maximum amount of oxygen a person can use in a one minute work out. A high V02 max makes the body more efficient for performance.


WARM-UP
This is preparation time before the proper work out begins. This may include light jogging to get the blood flowing through the muscles.


Back to top





IN THE GYM ::
Don't be a Homer - get fit in your own house!
How to stay fit in your home

MASTERCLASSES ::

James CracknellWorkout with the stars

::

James Cracknell

::

Matthew Pinsent

::

Angellica Bell

^^ Back to top
© BBC Contact us | Help | About us Disclaimer
Football  |  Cricket  |  Tennis  |  Golf  |  Rugby Union  |  Rugby League  |  Athletics  |  Basketball  |  Swimming
Other Sport  |  In the Gym  |  Healthy Eating  |  Treatment Room  |  Your Blueprint  |  Learning Centre