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Pitch and weather conditions
Around the Academy:

South African players inspect the wicket
On a humid, cloudy day, the ball is more likely to move in the air or "swing", as it's known in cricket.

Those sort of conditions are most commonly found in cooler countries like England and New Zealand.

"Greener" wickets with more grass on and a more damper surface are found in these countries and they help the quicker bowlers as they help movement off the seam.

The bowler will try and keep the seam of the ball in as upright a position as possible so that it makes good contact with the wicket when it pitches.

When the ball hits the pitch, the seam will react with the ground and create "movement off the seam".

Drier pitches in India and Pakistan are far more helpful to spin bowlers.

The pace of these pitches is a lot slower, giving a spinning ball more time to grip and "turn off the pitch".

But on these surfaces the bounce of the ball is far more inconsistent.

Play will be stopped if it rains or if there's bad light which may make batting conditions dangerous.





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