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BBC Sport You are in: Cricket: Rules: The basics  

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A reverse sweep
A match will normally be played with each side having one innings in a limited overs game or with both sides batting twice in a game played over a number of days.

Test matches are played over five days, while County Championship matches in England are played over four days.

Limited over cricket involves both sides bowling the same amount of overs to score their runs from, with the winner being the team that scores the most.

In most first class competitions each side will receive up to 50 overs, but in schools cricket it is normally a lot less.

However, if, for example, a team is bowled out after 40 overs in a 50 over match, the other team still has the full 50 overs in which to beat their score.

Play in Test matches is usually split into three two hour sessions, although a minimum number of overs to be bowled in a day is also usually agreed between the sides before a series begins.

A 40-minute lunch break is taken between the first two sessions of a day's play, with 20 minutes being allowed for tea after the end of the second session.





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