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The search for a Shane
Around the Academy:

Terry Jenner has been a big influence on Warne
Terry Jenner has been a big influence on Warne
The BBC Sport Academy reports on the search for England's very own Shane Warne.

Think of leg spin and you think of Shane Warne. And if you want to turn the ball as well as the best then it is to the best that you should turn.

Terry Jenner played nine Tests for Australia in the 1970s, but his biggest contribution to cricket Down Under and indeed worldwide, has been the influence he has had as a coach to Warne.

The pair first worked together when a teenage Warne joined the Australian cricket Academy.

And the blond Victorian rates Jenner as one of the biggest influences on his career.

English batsmen have had no answer to Warne
English batsmen have had no answer to Warne
Jenner is now helping the ECB in their quest to uncover a leg spinner for the England team by 2007.

And with his belief that leg spinners are "born and not made", he says there is no reason why England should not be producing their own versions of Warne, Anil Kumble and Stuart MacGill.

"You don't necessarily know that you're a leg spinner, because all you know is that you're a cricketer.

"That was what happened in my particular case. I joined a club and they were looking for a wicketkeeper.

"I wanted a game so I was a wicketkeeper. Then they wanted an opening bat, so I was an opening bat.

"I went to a Christmas coaching programme and we were divided into wicketkeepers etc.

"I was bowling a bit of spin to the rest of the wicketkeepers when one of the coaches walked past and said; "you're in the wrong net". That's when my leg spinning started.

Chris Schofield was given a brief chance by England
Chris Schofield was given a brief chance by England
"You don't have to be born and identified by the age of 12. You're born a leg spinner but you don't have to be identified until later, and that's a coach's job.

"Then the coach has to be patient and give them time to develop."

Chris Schofield, Lancashire's young leg spinner who was pitched into the England Test side at the age of 21 hasn't always bowled off a short run-up.

"I used to be a seam bowler and then my slower ball would be a leg spinner, but I found that I was getting more of my wickets with a leg spinner and so I thought lets get rid of the seam," says Schofield.

So don't be in too much of a hurry to limit yourself to a particular role. Explore all the opportunities in the game and see which suits your talents best.



Open Quote
You're born a leg spinner but you don't have to be identified until later, and that's a coach's job
Close Quote
Terry Jenner
Terry Jenner
Coach to Shane Warne

What is leg spin?
Leg spin involves turning a ball off the pitch from the leg side of a right-handed batsman, to the off side.
The ball is gripped across the seam, and as it is bowled the wrist helps the fingers spin the ball from leg to off.
The ball is released out of the front of the hand.
A good rhythm is necessary to land the ball in the right spot.

Open Quote
I used to be a seam bowler and then my slower ball would be a leg spinner, but I found that I was getting more of my wickets with a leg spinner
Close Quote
Chris Schofield
Chris Schofield
Lancashire & England leg spinner




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