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Tuesday, 25 June, 2002, 19:31 GMT 20:31 UK
World Cup diary: Korea
Korean World Cup fans have been given handy English language lessons
The party may be over but English lessons go on
BBC Sport Online's Stuart Roach

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Koreans aiming to improve their English can learn much from the weekly four-page English Update supplement.

Letter writing and common errors are discussed, but the Business English school makes particularly fun reading.

Many of the nine business tips, handily printed in English and Korean, could probably be translated onto the football pitch.

They are (in their words, not mine):

  • Big smile: No one spits on a smiling face

  • Make good eye contact: If you look somewhere else, it is rude

  • Keep promises: A promise is a promise

  • Be attentive: Just imagine a secretary who is polishing her nails while working

  • Be positive. Yes, I will do my best! Maybe I can't

  • Be creative: Don't be a passive worker

  • Be punctual: Please remember, time is money

  • Be neat: What do you think about dandruff on the shoulders of your colleague?

  • Dress appropriately: "Hey, this is a place for work, not for war games."

    The newspapers here in Korea are working overtime to cope with the flood of World Cup stories.

    The nation's continued interest in the competition has meant countless human interest stories on top of the regular sports news.

    And some hardened local news journalists clearly don't know what to make of it all.

    The caption writer for one English speaking national was clearly at a loss for words when presented with a picture of western football tourists in Korean shirts 'mooning' in the middle of a Seoul street party.

    But mooning is not one of Korea's better-known pastimes.

    If in doubt, play it straight, the caption writer clearly believed.

    He wrote: "Two foreign supporters of South Korean team pull their pants down Saturday in the Kwanghwamun area of downtown Seoul, overjoyed by South Korea's dramatic victory over Spain."

    The Korean government has designated 1 July a public holiday.

    The day after the World Cup final in Yokohama is seen as the perfect time to reflect on South Korea's achievements at this remarkable tournament.

    Appeals to give the nation a day off on Tuesday, the day of South Korea's semi-final clash with Germany, were rejected.

    Banks and export operations would be too severely disrupted it was claimed.

    But schools still closed early and many employers planned to give their workers the day off anyway.

    Those who didn't were probably flooded with resignation letters, given the number of people on the streets of Seoul by early Tuesday afternoon.


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