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Two Up/Two Down

Two Up/ Two Down
Sam Torrance celebrates after coming from three down to beat Andy North and secure a European win in 1985
The phrase ‘two up’ or ‘three up’ etc indicates the number of holes a player is leading his opponent by.

Conversely, ‘two down’ would be the number of holes a player is trailing by.

In Ryder Cup - and all other matchplay golf - the game is over when a player is more holes ahead than there are left to complete e.g. Three up with two to play, which would be denoted as a 3&2 win.

Results that are decided on the 18th are not shown 1&0 - as in none to play. Where a player is one hole ahead by the time they have left the 18th green, he is said to have won one up.

Similarly, if he is one up before also going on to win the 18th hole, he is said to have won the match two up. Results that are decided on the 18th are not shown 1&0 - as in none to play.

When players are level during the match, it is said to be ‘all-square’. If they are level at the end of 18 holes, the match is ‘halved’.



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