BBC SPORT Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC Sport
 You are in: TV & Radio: Test Match Special  
Sport Front Page
-------------------
Football
Cricket
Rugby Union
Rugby League
Tennis
Golf
Motorsport
Boxing
Athletics
Other Sports
-------------------
Special Events
-------------------
Sports Talk
-------------------
BBC Pundits
TV & Radio
Grandstand
Football Focus
Match of the Day
World Football
Test Match Special
Rugby Special
Ski Sunday
Sports International
Question of Sport
-------------------
Photo Galleries
Funny Old Game
-------------------
Around The UK: 
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales

BBC Sport Academy
BBC News
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS

  Thursday, 19 July, 2001, 16:17 GMT 17:17 UK
TMS by royal appointment
The Queen meets Peter Baxter, Henry Blofeld and Christopher Martin-Jenkins
At Her Majesty's Pleasure: Baxter, Blowers and CMJ
From lunch with the leader of the free world to tea and cake with Blowers.

Such was the varied programme undertaken by Her Majesty the Queen on Thursday when she treated US president George Bush to lunch before heading across London for a special date with the BBC's Test Match Special team.

Tradition abounds at Lord's and one of those is the Queen meeting the teams during the tea interval of Ashes Test matches.

But this time there was a difference for after meeting Steve Waugh, Mike Atherton and their men, she took tea with members of the TMS commentary team.

BBC cricket correspondent Jonathan Agnew led Henry Bloefeld, Christopher Martin-Jenkins, Bill Frindall and producer Peter Baxter into the pavilion for their royal appointment.

The Queen at the Lord's Test match
Her Majesty watches the cricket in company with Ted Dexter

And the Queen presented them with a cake, prepared in the Buckingham Palace kitchens, to mark 40 years of BBC Ashes commentaries.

The Dundee cake, adorned with almonds, was made by a senior Palace pastry chef in the shape of the number 40.

"The president of MCC Lord Alexander introduced me and then I introduced the team to her," said Baxter.

"The cake was good - very fruity."

And is the Queen an avid listener.

"She did not say she was, but then she didn't say she wasn't," said Baxter.

Cakes sent in by listeners have become a regular feature of Test Match Special, which has become a national institution since its first broadcast in 1957.

The Australian Broadcasting Commission's Tim Lane - a known republican - was left to hold the fort for listeners on Radio Four long wave.


 BBC SPORT BULLETINS
More Audio/Video


Click here for the history of TMS





Click here to read about the TMS presenters

Read about six of the greatest-ever commentators



E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Test Match Special stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

Sport Front Page | Football | Cricket | Rugby Union | Rugby League |
Tennis | Golf | Motorsport | Boxing | Athletics | Other Sports |
Special Events | Sports Talk | BBC Pundits | TV & Radio | Question of Sport |
Photo Galleries | Funny Old Game | N Ireland | Scotland | Wales