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Page last updated at 09:45 GMT, Tuesday, 27 July 2010 10:45 UK

The BBC wants your Great North Run stories

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The Great North Run - Your stories wanted

The Great North Run will be held for the 30th time on Sunday 19 September, live on the BBC.

To celebrate the 30th running of the famous event, track legend and BBC athletics pundit Michael Johnson wants YOUR stories of the race for a special documentary, to be shown on BBC One in September.

Michael Johnson
Michael Johnson wants YOUR stories

In collaboration with BBC North East and Cumbria, BBC Sport has sent Michael Johnson to Newcastle to get a feel for what makes the GNR such a special event.

The race was first run in 1981 and tempts runners from all over the world to the North East of England every year.

It is now the world's biggest half marathon and this year 54,000 places have been allocated (with more than 100,000 people applying!).

Around £10 million is raised for charities by competitors, and the run is estimated to generate £36 million annually for the North East.

Part of the documentary will include stories from people who've been part of the event whether they be committed athletes, celebrities or so-called 'fun'-runners!.

Runners cross the Tyne Bridge
Great North Runners cross the Tyne Bridge

We're looking for runners from every year the race has been held. Have you taken part in the race?

Why did you decide to run? What happened on the day?

Perhaps you ran in a loved-one's memory or lost 10 stone to take part?

Or maybe you were the final person to cross the line in the very first race?

Whatever your story, happy or sad, fast or slow, please get in touch before Friday 20 August.

Email your stories to therun@bbc.co.uk



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see also
Great North Run 2010 on BBC Tyne
17 May 10 |  Things to do
In pictures: GNR 2009 - Finish line
20 Sep 09 |  Things to do


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