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  Tuesday, 27 August, 2002, 16:38 GMT 17:38 UK
Q&A with Tony McCoy
Champion jockey Tony McCoy answers your e-mails on his record-breaking achievements.


McCoy broke the British record for jump victories after winning the opening two races at Uttoxeter on Tuesday - taking his tally to 1,700 and past Richard Dunwoody.

Since his first winner in 1992, McCoy has established himself as the dominant rider of his generation, and in April this year he broke Sir Gordon Richards' 55-year-old record of 269 winners in a season.


Adrian Brindley, UK

How soon did Richard Dunwoody get in touch with you and what did he say?

I speak to Richard quite regularly, and he sent me a message straight after race. He was genuinely happy for me.


Reginald Cayatano, UK

Congratulations Tony on your phenomenal achievement. Apart from Tuesday's victory, which of your 1,700 wins would you regard as the best or most memorable?

Probably when Pridwell beat Istabraq at the 1998 Aintree Festival - that was probably the best ride I've given a horse.


Natalie Roach, UK

Have you enjoyed the attention of being in the spotlight, or would you rather just get on with riding?

I enjoy the job I do, and obviously if you're successful at it you'll attract a lot of attention. So I suppose if that's the case I do enjoy it.


Ed Smyth, Dubai

Do you feel you get the recognition you deserve compared to other sports stars?

Probably not, but I think that racing in general is not as high profile as lots of other sports. But hopefully that will change - especially if we see more jockeys like Frankie Dettori.

He's probably the best known jockey around right know, and is recognised outside of racing circles.


Ollie Pinkerton, UK

What is your next target? Is the Grand National the race you want to win the most?

I'd obviously love to win the Grand National because it's the most famous horse race in the world. Having won most of the other big races, the National would be the one I'd really like to win.

However, it only comes once a year so it's not going to be easy. I'd also like to be champion jockey until I retire.


Kevin Bell, UK

Your passion for racing is well known. What is the craziest journey you have undertaken just to get a ride?

There have been times when we've driven from course to course probably faster than we should have, and flying around the country can be quite gruelling. There have been times when we've had to fly from Perth to Exeter, which is obviously not something you'd like to be doing every day.


Paul Pinto, UK

You were devastated when Valiramix died. How do you maintain your passion when such tragedies like that are only just round the corner?

Something like that takes a long time to get over - particularly knowing how brilliant the horse was going to be. It's something that I'll always remember and remains with me until this day.

No matter what happens to me in the future, that moment I found out what happened to both Gloria Victus and Valiramix will always be there.


Terry Harris, England

How long do you think you can carry on in the sport, and are you worried about 'burn out'?

I'd like to keep riding as long as I'm still happy that I'm performing at the top level and confident that I can still do a good job. As far as burn out goes, I've got people around me who organise every aspect of my life.

My PA Gee Armytage, my agent Dave Roberts, and trainer Martin Pipe take care of everything. I've got someone to do everything for me other than ride the horses, so hopefully the burn-out thing is a long way off, and won't happen at all.


James Baker, UK

Retirement may be a long way from your thoughts but do you plan to train horses when you quit the saddle?

No, that's definitely not something I'd consider.


John Haughey, Ireland

Did you compete in any other sports as a youngster? Do you have any other sporting passions apart from your chosen profession?

I used to play a bit of football as a youngster, and still play football indoors in the winter. I'm starting to get into golf as well, so those are my two main sports. I've not had much chance to get down to Highbury lately, but I'm hoping to go in the very near future.


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