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Monday, 21 May, 2001, 11:18 GMT 12:18 UK
Time to name and shame?
Lord Paul Condon, whose anti-corruption report is set to be published and (left) Hansie Cronje, banned for life on match-fixing charges
Anti-corruption investigator Sir Paul Condon is set to publish his initial findings into the match-fixing scandal later this week.

The International Cricket Council has stated that the report is likely to focus on the origins of corruption in the world game.

Is it time for the ICC to come clean and name and shame?

HAVE YOUR SAY

The preliminary report of Sir Paul Condon's investigation into match-fixing in cricket is expected to confirm corruption is still rife.

Condon, who was appointed last year to head the ICC's Anti-Corruption Unit, believes there is a core of players who remain involved in cricket corruption.

The BBC has learned that specific players will not be named in the report.

  Banned players
Hansie Cronje
Mohammad Azharuddin
Salim Malik
Ata-ur-Rehman

Previously, five players have been banned for life as a result of various match-fixing inquiries.

And inquiries are ongoing into allegations made by an Indian bookmaker against Brian Lara, Alec Stewart, Martin Crowe, Mark Waugh, Aravinda de Silva and Arjuna Ranatunga.

Is it time to end the suspicion hanging over the names of Test players involved?

HAVE YOUR SAY


Enough is enough! The time has come to sweep up every trace of corruption from world cricket
  Anindya Raychaudhuri, UK
Yes name them. Hansie was man enough to face what he did. I think that it`s time that every corrupt player no matter how great, be treated the same way. No special treatment!
Zelda Plaatjies, South Africa

How do we know that the corrupt players will be named? We are relying on evidence from dodgy bookies which could ruin careers of innocent players. I cannot see this problem going away.
Graeme Edgar, UK

I think they should be very careful, but definately name the corrupt players. Hansie had guts to own up, and we know he wasn't the only one. The rest are cowards, and deserve to be shamed. Professional Sport is a talent, and we need to preserve the nature of this and wipe out any negative aspects.
Ryan, South Africa

Care must be taken if people are to be named, as to what they have been accused of doing. Several players have been accused of meeting with bookmakers, most of them have just been accused of giving advice on team line-ups or weather reports. Some have simply been accused of giving match predictions. However, a very small amount of players have been accused of actual match fixing.

Martin Crowe, it seems, was giving information to an Indian bookmaker in the belief that he was a reporter, he even gave him a tour diary! There is a clear definition between players being duped into giving information and players trying to cheat, this distinction has yet to be made plain to the public but all those accused of supplying information to bookmakers have been castigated as cheats. We therefore need to be clear in the allegations before we besmirch the names of some of the finest players of our day.
Rob, England

The astonishing fact is that some of these player may still be fixing matches. While this is matter persists any test series or one day series result could have to be questioned. The sad state of affairs is that at least for the last decade all results should be questioned. Notably the World Cup final match with Pakistan and Australia. Its got to a stage where I am cynical about every result. The players have to be prosecuted, not just named and shamed.
Tony Montana, UK


We therefore need to be clear in the allegations before we besmirch the names of some of the finest players of our day.
  Rob, England

I don't believe that we have a problem with match fixing in England. It simply isn't something that would happen here. I am sure that none of the cricketers that I know would take a bribe. Naming and shaming will be unnecessary.
Sarah Bell-Hemridge, UK

Enough is enough! The time has come to sweep up every trace of corruption from world cricket. All concerned who are guilty should be publicly unmasked, banned for life from any position in the world of cricket, and be stripped of all their records. Only then can this disgraceful chapter be closed once and for all.
Anindya Raychaudhuri, UK

The ICC should name and shame. Any player found guilty should be dealt with severely. The message must be very clear - if you cheat you will not get away with it. If this means the cricketing community loses great players then so be it. In addition to life time bans, players found guilty of match fixing should be liable for losses suffered by punters. Harsh measures are required to clean up the game and stop contemporary and future players from going down the same path.
Chris, Republic of South Africa

I sincerely hope that the double standards set by the ACB will come to task . Their protection of Mark Waugh and Shane Warne was disgraceful.
RD, Malaysia

Naming and shaming would perhaps see the ends of the careers of more talented but foolishly corrupt players.
Zahid, UK

The one way to stop this is if the governments of India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka allow for legalised betting for cricket. This will stop the corruption.
Rienzie, Malaysia

The ICC should name the corrupt. Everyone should see the names of stars they idolise.
Khalid Khan, Australia

I do think the ICC should name and shame, and flush all the corrupt guys out of cricket. However, they do need to be 110 per cent sure before they start naming people.
Jeff Scholey, UK


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