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Thursday, 12 December, 2002, 15:33 GMT
Osborne fined by Jockey Club
Jamie Osborne
Osborne is a successful Flat trainer
Trainer Jamie Osborne was fined 4,000 by the Jockey Club for bringing racing into disrepute.

Osborne admitted the charge during Thursday's 40-minute hearing, which arose from unguarded comments broadcast during the BBC Kenyon Confronts programme.

Osborne was one of three trainers to face a hearing as a result of the documentary, which was aired in June.

A date has yet to be set for David Wintle's hearing while Ferdy Murphy was also found guilty of bringing racing into disrepute last month and fined the same amount.

I hope my commitment to training will erode the memory of this embarrassing episode

Jamie Osborne

Former jump jockey Osborne, who is now a Lambourn-based Flat trainer, was secretly filmed when approached by people purporting to be considering buying a horse from him.

He was quoted as saying he would be prepared to "cheat" and that he knew of an in-house jockey who could be used to that effect.

In a short statement after the hearing, Osborne was contrite.

"I would like to place on record my most sincere apologies to the industry for the part I have unwittingly played in the recent detrimental publicity that racing has suffered," he said.

"It was not, and never will be, my intention to take part in any activity that would be damaging to racing."

Jockey Club PR director John Maxse said two factors were involved in reaching the verdict.

"Not only did the Committee take into account the damage done to the sport through the broadcast but also that in the eyes of the Jockey Club it is not acceptable for trainers to be seen to be agreeing to undertake activities that would be in breach of the rules in order to attract a new owner."

An in-depth look as horse racing faces its freshest hurdle

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