BBC SPORT Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC Sport
 You are in: Other Sports: Horse Racing  
Sport Front Page
-------------------
Football
Cricket
Rugby Union
Rugby League
Tennis
Golf
Motorsport
Boxing
Athletics
Other Sports
Statistics
US Sport
Horse Racing
Snooker
Sailing
Cycling
Skiing
-------------------
Special Events
-------------------
Sports Talk
-------------------
BBC Pundits
TV & Radio
Question of Sport
-------------------
Photo Galleries
Funny Old Game
-------------------
Around The UK: 
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales

BBC Sport Academy
BBC News
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS

  Saturday, 6 April, 2002, 18:03 GMT 19:03 UK
Record crowds at Aintree
Aintree continues to pull in the punters
This year's Grand National was a huge success
BBC Sport Online's Frank Keogh rounds up the news from Grand National day at Aintree.

Record crowds totalling more than 120,000 attended the three days of the Martell Grand National meeting.

The big-race victory by Bindaree in a pulsating tussle with What's Up Boys was watched by some 63,500 racegoers.

Sunny weather also ensured Thursday (20,416) and Friday (42,700) boasted modern-day record attendances.

Racecourse managing director Charles Barnett said: "The crowd figures over the three days illustrate the enormous growth in popularity of the Aintree Festival."


Bouyant bookies

Bookmakers were also toasting the National, which was the first to be run since tax-free betting was introduced last October and helped total turnover in the UK top 120m for the only time.

The victory of a relatively unfancied horse, in 20-1 shot Bindaree, proved a welcome bonus.

David Hood, spokesman for bookies William Hill, said: "All of the first four in the race were popular with punters, but the winner was possibly the best of them for bookmakers."

The Tote clocked up record on-course turnover of more than 3m.


Stable relationship

Grand National winner Bindaree had an old friend keeping him company as he closed in on victory - but he could have done without the attention.

Victorious jockey Jim Culloty had to switch his mount as stable-mate Beau, who had unseated rider Carl Llewellyn at the 14th fence, carried on running and threatened to hamper Bindaree's progress.

Bindaree's owner Raymond Mould was able to joke about the loose horse, also trained by Nigel Twiston-Davies, after the race.

"I think Beau was trying to get back in front to show that he was the best horse in the yard," said Mould.


Horses killed

The Grand National was marred by the death of two horses in the 40-strong field.

Manx Magic, who fell at the 20th fence, died when he fractured his neck.

The Last Fling, who had led for much of the race, was another fatality after coming down at the 24th obstacle.

Jockey Club vet Peter Webbon said: "Sadly, The Last Fling sustained a serious injury to his back. After a comprehensive examination, it was clear he was not capable of making a recovery and he was humanely put down."

The world's most famous steeplechase

Bindaree's triumph

Our man at Aintree

Clickable guides

Video links

PHOTO GALLERIES

SPORTS TALK

INTERNET LINK
See also:

06 Apr 02 | Grand National 2002
06 Apr 02 | Horse Racing
06 Apr 02 | Horse Racing
Links to more Horse Racing stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Horse Racing stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

Sport Front Page | Football | Cricket | Rugby Union | Rugby League |
Tennis | Golf | Motorsport | Boxing | Athletics | Other Sports |
Special Events | Sports Talk | BBC Pundits | TV & Radio | Question of Sport |
Photo Galleries | Funny Old Game | N Ireland | Scotland | Wales