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Australia's Torah Bright clinches half-pipe victory

Torah Bright

Bright shines after fall in half-pipe

Australia's Torah Bright recovered from a disastrous opening run to win the women's half-pipe at Cypress Mountain.

Bright responded with a near faultless second run to score 45.0, after falling on her first run, to beat Americans Hannah Teter and Kelly Clark.

Defending champion Teter notched 42.4 in her opening run to win silver while Clark posted 42.2 to take bronze.

Britain's Lesley McKenna could not hide her frustration after falling on both her qualification runs.

The 35-year-old, who was competing at her third Olympics, finished 30th after scores of 5.1 and 2.8 out of 50.

She said: "It is irritating and disappointing as I was really on form during training."

 Lesley McKenna

Brit snowboarder has a shocker on half-pipe

McKenna insists she will remain in the sport and is keen to pass on her experience to British youngsters.

"It's amazing that anyone from Britain has done so well in snowboarding when you consider our lack of facilities," she said.

"But there's a massive amount of British talent and I hope that talent is nurtured in the future.

"I'm going to continue coaching and I'll still be involved in snowboarding a lot.

"I've got a lot of experience to give away and I'm glad that some of that experience will help other people."

Bright expressed her relief at nailing her tricks at the second time of asking.

"I'm just so excited that I was able to put down that second run.

"When I was standing up top I was like 'well, you know I did fall on that first run but all I can do is put that behind me and just go and do it,'" she said.



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see also
Superb White dominates half-pipe
18 Feb 10 |  Snowboarding
GB Olympic bosses to help skiers
05 Feb 10 |  Alpine skiing


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