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Page last updated at 16:43 GMT, Tuesday, 23 February 2010

Day 12 as it happened

(All times local. GMT -8)

To get involved text us your views & comments on 81111 (UK) using OLYMPICS as your first word or +44 7786200666 (worldwide). (Not all contributions can be used)

By Ollie Williams in Vancouver

1929: Our live text coverage is coming to a close so that we, like Nicola Minichiello, can come out fighting on Wednesday, when six medals are at stake. There will be women's giant slalom, men's ice hockey quarter-finals, the British men's curling play-off against Sweden, the denouement of the women's bobsleigh and the aerials final, among other events. Don't miss any of that and, if you don't want to miss the rest of the women's short programme at the figure skating, the curling or the two ice hockey play-offs still to come before Vancouver shuts down for the day, you can follow those sports using our live statistics pages.

Bobsleigh

1913: Nicola Minichiello has come out fighting after her bid for Olympic gold appeared to grind to a halt down in 10th place following two of her four runs.

"Until we've crossed the finish line at the end of fourth run we're still shooting for the gold medal," she said. "That's what we're going for and that's what we've always been going for.

"On this track anything is possible. Let's see who is still standing at the end of four runs tomorrow."

Curling

1909: The final women's curling round-robin games are taking place. The British team crashed out of the competition earlier and the four semi-finalists are already decided - Canada, Sweden, China and Switzerland - but these games will decide the semi-final match-ups, as well as rankings for the remaining teams. Use our detailed results pages for the current standings and scores in the final games just starting at the Vancouver Olympic Centre.

Bobsleigh

1902: The USA 2 team of Erin Pac and Elana Meyers lead the bobsleigh briefly but top Canadian duo Kaillie Humphries and Heather Moyse breeze past them to lead by 0.13 seconds, in an overall time of 1:46.20.

To give that some context, Germany's Cathleen Martini and Romy Logsch are third 0.27 seconds behind the Americans, and Canadians Helen Upperton (whose parents are both from Hampshire, I'll have you know) and Shelly-Ann Brown are third, just two hundredths of a second behind the Germans.

The two British teams are 10th and 11th - Minichiello and Cooke leading Walker and Thomas by 0.19 seconds. The former would have wanted to be much higher up the rankings at this halfway stage. The next and final two runs take place on Wednesday.

Laura in Dublin texts: "Why are all the bobsleigh teams going in reverse order of placing, bar the Irish girls?"

My understanding is that the top 20 teams go in reverse order. All teams below that mark go in a different order but, given the Irish are the 21st and last team, they are in an order all of their own. Which I'm sure was thrilling news to them.

Ice hockey

Result: Canada 8-2 Germany

That is about as emphatic a response as Canada could have mustered after their humbling at the hands of the US team. It also sets up a quarter-final against Russia. All four quarter-finals will be live via the BBC website on Wednesday.

Figure skating

1845: Canada's Cynthia Phaneuf takes a tumble but seems happy with her performance as she takes her seat in the "kiss-and-cry". Yes, that little sofa is actually called that. Her score of 57.16 wipes the smile off her face though. She's third for now but there are some big names still to come. We have breakdowns of each score on the women's short programme results page.

Ice hockey

1844: Canada 8-2 Germany

Manuel Klinge slaps a rebound home from close range for Germany. As consolations go, that isn't one.

1841: Canada 8-1 Germany

Rick Nash becomes Canada's seventh scorer. Two minutes left.

Bobsleigh

1840: The Britain 2 team of Paula Walker and Kelly Thomas are still leading at the bobsleigh, but here come the Britain 1 duo of Nicola Minichiello and Gillian Cooke. The runners don't seem to be holding in the snow and there's plenty of clattering around, but GB 1 go 0.19 seconds ahead at the finish, even though their second run wasn't as fast as their team-mates' attempt. The live timings pages on our site will give you the full picture.

1834: Psst. Are you a woman wanting to know the secret to winning Winter Olympic gold? Then listen up, because the Russian biathlon relay women - crowned Olympic champions earlier - have a message for you:

"I would say don't be afraid, go ahead and have babies and get better in sports. It is a very stimulating experience and I would recommend having kids, don't be afraid of it, you will only get better."

That comes from biathlon team members Olga Zaitseva and Olga Medvedtseva. Nicola Minichiello and Gillian Cooke are about to go in the bobsleigh. No children yet between them. All hope is lost.

1832: That's a huge improvement from Paula Walker and Kelly Thomas in the women's bobsleigh up in Whistler. They go top for the time being with an overall time of 1:47.77, although the leaders from the first run have yet to go.

Ice hockey

1830: Canada 7-1 Germany

Number seven scored by Scott Niedermayer on the breakaway. Pipe down, Canadians, I'm trying to watch some bobsleigh.

Christopher in York texts: "Anyone notice a trend here? Ice time for Jarome Iginla equals goals and lots of them for Canada. No ice time for Iginla equals few goals for Canada. Hmm. You do the math."

I reckon ice hockey is the most sarcastic of all the Winter Olympic events.

1822: Canada 6-1 Germany

We're only seven minutes into the third period and Mike Richards lifts the puck past Thomas Greiss after it somehow sails through a couple of German players. Wonder if Canada can make double figures. That would be a suitable response to the US debacle.

Bobsleigh

1817: The start list for run two of the women's bobsleigh shows British teams going seventh (Paula Walker and Kelly Thomas) and 11th (Nicola Minichiello and Gillian Cooke). After one run, Canada's Kaillie Humphries and Heather Moyse lead.

Ice hockey

1814: Canada 5-1 Germany

Sidney Crosby bends down on his left knee to guide Eric Staal's pass home. No sign of any Germans. Maybe they were round the back, cutting more holes in the net.

1811: I had a quick look in an "Olympic superstore" in the middle of town earlier. Having seen the price tags, family members who were expecting presents from Vancouver can forget it. I'm not going to quote prices but think of any Olympic merchandise, have a guess, and treble it. Bobsleigh run two coming up.

1802: And all is quiet. Ice resurfacing at the figure skating, ice resurfacing at the hockey, pause before the second run at the bobsleigh. So that'd be ice, ice, bobsleigh.

Ice hockey

1759: Two periods down and the Canadians have accelerated into a 4-1 lead over Germany. Comprehensive statistics from the first two periods are now available on our live results pages. If you missed Shea Weber's goal, which somehow passed through the netting without even breaking the twine, you need to find a replay. You won't see anything like it again.

Bobsleigh

1758: British bobsleigh's Nicola Minichiello is 10th after her first run. Here is her verdict on that: "It was only the first of four runs, so it's still early days and there's a lot of the competition left to go. Everyone's ambition is to get four good, clean runs. The falling snow made things quite difficult and we skidded about a bit."

Ice hockey

Ian in Northampton texts: "I really wanted to see the Germans cause an upset tonight, but the only time they even look remotely comfortable on the puck is when they're on a powerplay. Maybe the Canadians should pull one of their players, just to make it a bit fairer."

Sent in just before that German goal, mind you. Will anything change now?

1753: Canada 4-1 Germany

Canadian goalie Roberto Luongo ends up sprawled on the ice having tangled with Germany's Marco Sturm, allowing Marcel Goc to claw a goal back with a few minutes remaining in the second period.

Bobsleigh

rafamoroni tweets: "Is being tall an advantage for bobsleigh? (See 1742 entry.) Surely it would be a disadvantage."

Figure skating

1750: Jenna McCorkell suffers a big old fall and that'd damage anybody's confidence - she practically went into the boards at the side of the Pacific Coliseum ice. The rest of the routine feels tinged with a kind of resignation to her fate after that, and the Northern Ireland 23-year-old holds her head in her sequined hands at the end. Her score of 40.64 places her second-last in the women's short programme and she will not qualify for the free skate on Thursday. She's still shaking her head - her Olympics is over.

Bobsleigh

1742: Ireland's Aoife Hoey and Claire Bergin are down in last place after their first bobsleigh run. Their start didn't help and their time of 55.04 is bottom of the pile so far. Apparently Aoife Hoey is the tallest woman in this entire Olympic Games. I am not done with that fact.

Ice hockey

1740: Canada 4-0 Germany

At least the net stopped that one, because Thomas Greiss certainly didn't. Jarome Iginla with his second of the night.

Figure skating

1739: Jenna McCorkell will skate next for Great Britain in the women's short programme at Pacific Coliseum.

Curling

1736: British men's curling skip David Murdoch, on facing Sweden in a play-off on Wednesday: "We just have to see it as another game. At least we are not out of it, that's the main thing. If we win we would play Canada in the semi-finals and we like playing them, it always brings the best out in us. It is not something we are scared of."

Bobsleigh

1734: The daft developments at the hockey prevented me updating you on the bobsleigh, where the second British team posted a time of 54.19. With five teams still to go that puts them 13th, while Minichiello and Cooke have moved down to 10th overall.

Ice hockey

1731: Canada 3-0 Germany

Get ready for that Canada-Russia quarter-final as Jarome Iginla shovels a rebound into the net.

1729: Canada 2-0 Germany. And that is ridiculous.

Shea Weber shoots through the netting at the hockey, scoring a goal for Canada, but it's tricky enough to pick out goals in this sport without the puck going directly through the net. We are seeing replay after replay - it is a clear goal and that is the first time in my life I've seen the puck scorch through the goal. You can even see the rubber marks on the twine, but the netting itself isn't broken! That's not a goal, it's a magic trick.

1724: Back to the bobsleigh for the second British team in a moment. Meanwhile the second period between Canada and Germany has started at the men's hockey, with the Canadians tails-up and already testing German goalie Thomas Greiss once again.

Bobsleigh

1722: Not the fastest from Minichiello and Cooke at the start, and their fairly untidy run sees them finish up ninth of the 10 teams to go so far. Not what the British duo wanted but there are three runs to go.

1719: Britain's Minichiello and Cooke are next to go in the bobsleigh.

Figure skating

1717: Jenna McCorkell's warm-up is over at the women's short programme figure skating. She'll be last to go in her group of five.

Bobsleigh

1712: Canada's second bobsleigh team - Helen Upperton and Shelly-Ann Brown - go fourth in a time of 53.50. Four more teams to go until Britain 1 make their competitive Whistler debut. (The numbers distinguish between different crews representing the same country - up to three teams can compete on behalf of any one nation. In this event, somewhat oxymoronically named the women's two-man, the Germans and Americans have three teams, while Britain have two.)

Ice hockey

1707: Canada take a one-goal lead over Germany into the first period break. Check out all the stats from the opening 20 minutes.

Bobsleigh

1704: Two bobsleigh teams have gone, and the track record has been broken twice. The Canada 1 team are the latest to do so. Use our bobsleigh live statistics pages to follow all the timings in detail.

1701: The moment the men's curling wraps up for the day, we have women's bobsleigh vying for attention. The big British medal hopes here are Nicola Minichiello and Gillian Cooke, who between them are the world number one ranked pair. They will be 10th to go in the first of four runs, with fellow Britons Paula Walker and Kelly Thomas going 13th. Watch live online if you're in the UK.

Curling

1655: A final note on the men's curling. There is now a set time for that play-off between Britain and Sweden: 1400Van/2200UK on Wednesday. (Not Thursday as I think I wrote earlier.)

Ice hockey

1653: Canada 1-0 Germany

Joe Thornton polishes off a Dany Heatley pass to give Canada the lead midway through the first period, which lifts the atmosphere accordingly.

Ever-loving-but-momentarily-disgruntled Canucks fan texts: "The real question isn't why change Iginla and Crosby (see Steve's text earlier). It's more like why Staal, a natural centre, is up as a winger. If Canada coach Mike Babcock also loves the San Jose line so much, why aren't they up as a unit on the power play when they're most effective?"

Recalling my plea for names on texts (see 1540 entry), you have all raised your game spectacularly with regard to giving me names to use. Thanks.

Curling

1648: The Danes leave Sweden a relatively easy shot to tie up a 7-6 victory with their final stone at the men's curling. That means Great Britain will go into a play-off against Sweden, which will take place on Thursday, to decide who goes into the semi-finals.

1644: We're down to the last few stones in the men's curling game between Sweden and Denmark as Canada go on the power play against Germany in the hockey. Plenty happening...

Ice hockey

1639: All the early action inside Canada Hockey Place is happening inside Germany's own zone. Jonathan Toews is looking lively. A contrast to the US game, where the Canadians were nervy from the outset.

Steve in Edinburgh texts: "Canada simply need to stop tweaking their forward lines. Why anyone would change the first line of Crosby and Iginla is beyond me. As far as the goaltender is concerned, Brodeur made some questionable plays but did so because his defense was slow in transition out of the zone. The New Jersey Devils built an entire system on quick defense with Marty playing a pivotal role. Marty never comes out to make those plays unless necessary. Pronger needs to be used sparingly, he's slow and resorts to cheap penalties if he's beat."

It amazes me that anyone in the UK is able to supply hockey analysis by text to that level of depth at gone midnight. Here we go, the hockey is now live on air - it's Canada against Germany with a quarter-final tie against Russia at stake.

Curling

1630: Sweden have given Denmark a point in the ninth end which draws the score level at 6-6, but conceding that point means the Swedish men keep the hammer - the last stone - in the deciding end, which could prove vital. If Sweden win, it'll force the British men into a play-off to see who reaches the semi-finals.

Figure skating

1626: The hockey is not far off but the women's short programme figure skating is also about to begin at Pacific Coliseum. Britain's Jenna McCorkell will be last to go in the second group, which is maybe an hour off. Canada's Joannie Rochette, whose mother died suddenly a few days ago, is in the last group.

Both the figure skating and the hockey are available to watch live online if you live in the UK. My focus will be on the hockey and then we'll pick up the final group or two of the women's short programme alongside the bobsleigh later.

Curling

1616: Britain's men have conceded a 9-5 defeat against Norway, two ends early. All eyes on Denmark-Sweden, which is still 6-5 to Sweden in the ninth end.

Ice hockey

Andy in Derby texts: "This game against Germany is just what Canada need to get them firing for Russia. The class of Crosby et al will show through."

Ade texts: "Sidney Crosby really needs to step up his game. He has been a shadow of himself so far. What price for a hat-trick? Luongo deserves his chance but, being a Pittsburgh Penguins fan, I'd have preferred Marc-Andre Fleury in goal."

Vancouverite in London texts: "'Arguable'? (See end of 1540 entry.) Brodeur was flopping around two metres from the net when the US nailed the coffin. King Lui holds court tonight."

Curling

1607: Ooh. A "three" for Norway finishes off the seventh end at the curling. Three more ends to go and Britain's men are now 9-4 down. If Britain win they go through to the semi-finals - lose and they'll probably face a play-off. Not, however, if Denmark can beat Sweden. The Danes were 6-1 down but have hauled that back to a 6-5 deficit. If Sweden lose, Britain qualify for the semis anyway. Capiche?

Speed skating

1602: Things are a tad quiet as we build up to the hockey and the bobsleigh, though Britain's male curlers are about to finish their seventh end against Norway. In the meantime I'd like to talk about speed skating - the long course stuff, not short track. I went to the Richmond Olympic Oval to watch it before settling down in the live text cooler, and it is bonkers in there. At least half the spectators - I do not exaggerate - are Dutch. Some seating sections are walls of orange. There is even a band, replete with tuba, to entertain the crowd while the ice is being resurfaced. During my brief stay I enjoyed the sight of thousands of Dutch speed skating fans singing along to Sweet Caroline. Even the scoreboard operates in Dutch.

Just a shame I had to leave before Sven Kramer's disastrous lane switch (or lack thereof). I have always wondered what a tuba dropped from a great height sounds like.

Ice hockey

WH_Winegarden tweets: "I think the goaltending change is good for Canada. Luongo knows this rink and, trust me, that matters!"

J_Donovan tweets: "Roberto Luongo is on home ice. It seems the stage is set for a fairytale gold for him."

In case this doesn't make much sense - after all, the whole Canadian team are technically "on home ice" for the duration of the Games - Luongo's Vancouver team in the NHL play in the same rink that is hosting the Olympic tournament. Read NHL.com's interview with Luongo for more.

1543: No matter Brodeur's culpability versus the US, he won't start for Canada against Germany. Here's our ice hockey commentator Bob Ballard with more on that game.

"One newspaper in Canada had the headline 'Woe Canada' after the US defeat. What will they be writing on Wednesday if the home nation fail to beat Germany? There is the mouth-watering prospect of a meeting with Russia in the last eight but don't think this meeting with Germany is a foregone conclusion - in their last two Winter Olympic meetings, Canada have only beaten them on a penalty shot and by one goal in Salt Lake City.

"The change in netminder to the Vancouver Canucks' Roberto Luongo, instead of Brodeur, will mean an even more raucous atmosphere inside Canada Hockey Place. That should lead to the crowd being the sixth player out on the ice for Canada."

1540: During the last Canada hockey game, I had enough texts to fill Sidney Crosby's bank account but the overwhelming majority didn't have any name attached, making it very difficult to point out to Martin Brodeur exactly which of you wanted him hooked after 10 minutes. I want to hear your views on Canada-Germany or, if you think that's a done deal, the prospect of Canada-Russia - and today's two other quarter-final match-ups. But please, please stick a name on them. I promise not to let Marty know.

To send me your comments: Text 81111 (UK) using OLYMPICS as your first word or use +44 7786200666 worldwide. Alternatively send me a tweet (@bbcsport_ollie).

(If you don't know who Brodeur is, then I recommend his official website for more details. If you're wondering what I intend doing to him with a hook, it's an expression which refers to "hooking" one goalie off the ice to replace him with another, especially if the former is performing badly. How much Canada's defeat owed to Brodeur's performance is arguable.)

Curling

1538: Bobsleigh and ice hockey can wait for the time being. Earlier today, Britain's straitened curlers crashed out of the women's competition following a 6-5 defeat against Canada. Team GB's men are in a better position, though. They are playing Norway as I type - if they win, they go through to the semi-finals. Lose and they will most likely face a play-off. The score is currently Britain 4-6 Norway in the sixth of 10 ends.

1535: Hello, everybody. Last time we spoke, the Canadian men's ice hockey team had just been stunned by the US. In about an hour's time they must pick themselves up and face unfancied Germany in their play-off, which they must win in order to reach the quarter-finals, where the Russians await. As that game gets under way in Vancouver, the world number one British women's bobsleigh team begin their quest for gold in Whistler. Do not touch that dial. Key. Mouse. Thing. Just don't touch it.

Open these pages in new tabs for full, real-time statistics as we go on:

By Anna Thompson

1530: That's the end of my two live text commentary stints for today and it's time to handover to the very capable Ollie Williams.

Curling

1325: We've had five ends in the men's curling and Norway have opened up a two-point gap to lead GB 6-4 at the interval. GB will automatically go through to the semis if they win, or if Sweden lose, but the Swedes are beating their Scandinavian counterparts Denmark 6-3 at the mo. For the latest, my best friend the live stats page will keep you bang up to date.

Alpine skiing

1310: All 9,000 skiers, maybe a slight exaggeration, have now completed the men's giant slalom. I say completed, out of 101 starters, 81 finished the two legs, which you may remember was won by Swiss Carlo Janka, in a time of 2:37:83 . In case you're interested the GB skiers - Andy Noble, Ed Drake and Dave Ryding - were 36th, 37th and 47th respectively. Last man standing was India's Jamyang Namgial who was 57.09 seconds behind Janka. If that's not what embodies the Olympic spirit, I don't know what does. for a full list of results see our live stats page.

Speed skating

1455: We've had lots of texts and tweets in from you re Sven Kramer. We can clarify what happened to the Dutchman, who found himself sensationally disqualified from the men's 10,000m speed skating event earlier: he picked the wrong lane in which to skate. On the approach to the cone which marks the start of a corner, a competitor has to move into the correct lane. Just into the second half of his race at the time, Kramer should have been heading into the outside lane, and looked to be doing so until coach Gerard Kemkers began to talk to him from the sidelines. Kramer then changed direction and moved towards the inside lane, passing fractionally inside the cone, with his left leg planted on the inside and his right skate raised on the outside. It is not clear why he ended up failing to switch lane correctly, but Kramer appears to be blaming Kemkers for giving him the wrong information.

"I was on my way to make the right decision and right before the corner I changed my decision because of the advice from the coach," he said. "But at the end of the day, it is my responsibility. I am the skater on the ice, I have to do it."


Results

1450: It's raining medals as Austria defend their nordic combined team GOLD up in Whistler and America reach the podium in this event for the first time in their Olympic history. Germany secure the bronze.

Ice hockey

1445: Switzerland have beaten Belarus 3-2 after a shoot-out and will now face US in the quarter-finals.

Curling

1435: Phew, time to get our breath back after the swashbuckling ski cross with the relative calm that is curling. GB men lose two in the first end but a mistake by Norway, in their ridiculous red, silver and white harlequin-patterned trousers, sees GB take three in the second end to lead 3-2.

Results

1430: GOLD for Canada's Ashleigh McIvor in the women's ski cross. BBC commentator Graham Bell says: "It's been a happy hunting ground Cypress for Canada." And he's not wrong as Alexandre Bilodeau won the moguls gold there and local lady Maelle Ricker triumphed in the snowboard cross. That's six golds now for the host nation. Norway are also having a good day after their medal success in the men's GS. Here in the ski cross 33-year-old veteran Hedda Berntsen secures silver and Marion Josserand of France the bronze. Austria's Karin Huttary finishes medal-less in fourth, her chances gone in the first few seconds as she struggled to get over the first couple of bumps.

Freestyle skiing

1425: As the snow starts dumping it down at Cypress Mountain we've reached the business end of the women's ski cross. Canada's Kelsey Serwa secures fifth place with victory in the small or B final, which was made up of youngsters, Fanny Smith, who's just 17, among them.

Speed skating

1415: Poor Sven Kramer was four seconds ahead of Lee Seung-hoon and thought he had won his second gold of the Games as he crossed the line, oblivious of his elementary mistake (see 1345). His victory celebration suddenly ended when Dutch coach Gerard Kemkers told the skater what he had done. Kramer slung away his glasses in disgust but it was no-one else's fault but his, the banana.

Curling

1405: The afternoon session is starting in the men's curling and GB men are taking on Norway. A win for David Murdoch's men will see them safely through to the semi- finals.

Alpine skiing

1400: For the first time in these Games the US are not on the podium in alpine skiing, with Ted Ligety their highest placed finisher in the GS in ninth. Just thought I'd let you that amazing stat!

Results

1352: Swiss cowbells are ringing and flags waving as 24-year-old Carlo Janka wins GOLD in the giant slalom. Norway's Kjetil Jansrud secures silver and team-mate Aksel Lund Svindal secures his third medal of the Games with a bronze. So no Austrians on the podium and BBC summariser Alain Baxter says: "They will be fuming".

Results

1345: There's drama in the 10,000m speed skating, as "winner" Sven Kramer is disqualified after his skate goes over the outside cone. It's a schoolboy error and the Dutchman's head is in his hands. So GOLD for Korea's Lee Seung- Hoon, silver for Russia's Ivan Skobrev and bronze for the Netherlands' Bob de Jong.

Alpine skiing

1340: Defending Olympic champion Benjamin Raich hooks his arm through a gate which slows him down and costs him the gold medal. BBC summariser Alain Baxter "So many of the racers have done that," "I'm wondering of it's something to do with the light?" he ponders.

Alpine skiing

1335: We're heading towards the climax in the men's GS with Norway's Kjetil Jansrud leading with eight racers to go, a healthy 0.66secs lead.

Ice hockey

1330: If the crazy madcap world of ski cross is your thang, it's certainly mine, then you'll be pleased to hear the knockout stages are well under way at a blustery and snowy Cypress Mountain. Pre-race favourite Ophelie David is safely through to the quarter-finals and the Canadians will be well represented too.

Ice hockey

1325: Switzerland and Belarus are 2-2 in the second period, with the winner facing the USA in the quarter-finals. Keep bang up to date through our live stats page.

Alpine skiing

1315: Swiss Didier Cuche leads the GS at the moment but the top guys are yet to race so he's not particularly hopeful of staying on the podium. It's been a tough Games for the veteran, having disappointed in the downhill and super-G.

Speed skating

1305: We're down to the final four skaters in the 10,000m at Richmond Olympic Oval and Korea's Lee Seung-Hoon, the 5,000m silver medallist, has set a blistering target, a new Olympic record of 12:58.55. Can Flying Dutchman Sven Kramer knock him off the top again? we'll find out soon.

Alpine skiing

1255: The second leg of the men's giant slalom starts in five, with the top 30 skiers from the first leg racing in reverse order so Sweden's Markus Larsson will kick it off and Swiss Carlo Janka, who was fastest, will go 30th. After that the rest of them do their second legs to determine their final positions. I reckon this has been the most global event of the Winter Olympics as 61 nations were represented from the 101 starters. Among them were 16-year-old Peruvian Manfred Oettl Reyes, wearing a llama patterned ski suit, Morocco's "Couscous Rocket" Samir Azzimani and 51-year-old Mexican Hubertus von Hohenlohe, a Liechtenstein-based pop singer and businessman who was born before the Beatles got together and was the last down the piste in his fifth Olympics - first since 1994. Pakistan's Muhammad Abbas became the first athlete from his country to compete at a Winter Games, gingerly negotiating the twists and turns to cross the line 21 seconds slower than Janka. But he wasn't the slowest as India's Jamyang Namgial was 29.50 seconds off the pace after the first run. I think we can safely say he won't be on the podium!

Results

1240: The first GOLD of the day goes to the Russian biathlon team, who easily beat France and Germany in the 4x6km relay. They were the defending Olympic champions and reigning world champs so it was pretty much expected of them.

1230: Your views and comments are always appreciated, you can text me on 81111 (UK) using OLYMPICS as your first word or +44 7786200666 (worldwide) or tweet me. And a bit of housekeeping, a nice little refresh will work wonders.

1220: We've got four medal events today (men's 10,000m speed skating, women's 4x6km biathlon relay, team nordic combined and women's ski cross) but no chance of any British podium success in those. However things are looking brighter for the men's curlers, who will qualify for the semi-finals outright if they beat Norway. Match starts at 1400 (2200 GMT). And another of our remaining medal hopes are the women's bobsleigh duo Minichiello and Cook, and who knows GB could spring a surprise in the short track speed skating with Elise Christie racing in the 1000m heats and Jon Eley in the 500m tomorrow. So there's plenty still to look forward to.

By Rob Hodgetts

Ice hockey

1210: Switzerland are now playing Belarus in the first of four qualifiers to decide the quarter-final line-up. Whoever wins this one will play USA. Four teams are already through - USA, Russia, Sweden and Finland. The big one, as far as the entire Canadian nation is concerned, is at 1630 local time (0030 GMT) when their heroes play Germany following that defeat by the US. That game is on red button TV and this website (UK users only). There's also Czech Republic v Latvia and Slovakia v Norway. You can see how the draw is unfolding on our ice hockey results/schedule pages.

I should just add that men's 10,000m speed skating is under way at the Richmond Oval. And with that, Anna Thompson is coming back on at the Fridge End to take you through the afternoon. I'm off to Whistler to bring you tweets and blogs from Nicola Minichiello and Gillian Cooke's bid for bobsleigh glory. Have fun.

1200: Let's try to catch up elsewhere - in the men's nordic combined team event, Finland lead from USA and Austria after the ski jumping. The Finns will have a 0.02-second lead over the Americans with Austria starting 36 secs back in the 5km cross country relay. Britain's Sarah Sauvey finishes 33rd out of 35 starters and is one of three racers to fail to qualify from the ski cross qualification round. Heats begin at 1300 (2100 GMT). Women's 4x6km biathlon relay is under way, with France holding a narrow lead.

Curling

1150: Canada skip Cheryl Bernard delivers the final stone and her side win 6-5 to progress as Great Britain crash out of the Games after three wins from six matches. Have a look at the curling tables to get the full picture.


Curling

1145: BRITAIN'S WOMEN'S CURLERS ARE OUT OF THE GAMES - Switzerland beat Germany 4-2 and now have five wins, so even if GB beat Canada they will only have four wins and can't qualify. "I get the feeling they're going to get the steal, win the match and we'll all say 'if only,'" says BBC commentator Steve Cram.

Alpine skiing

1140: Bit more GS chat for you as the 11th end in GB v Canada takes shape. Twenty two skiers are more than 10 seconds behind and three are more than 20 seconds back. Surely that's the skiing equivalent of an Eddie Edwards or Eric the Eel? I thought that sort of thing was now frowned up on at the Games. Ghana's Snow Leopard didn't race, though, so you can't blame him. I should also tell you that women's ski cross qualification is under way at Cypress.

Curling

1132: EXTRA END FOR GB V CANADA Britain lie two with one skip stone left for each side. Eve Muirhead sends down her last stone and they lie three, with the shorter stone acting as a guard. Canada skip Cheryl Bernard puffs out her cheeks and throws the last stone of regulation. The stone looks like travelling through the house and giving Britain the win with three, but it ends up lying second and Britain steal one to level the score at 5-5. Bad news from the other sheet, though, as Switzerland lead Germany 4-2 in the final end.

Alpine skiing

1125: Let's round up the first run of the men's giant slalom shall we? Yep, we shall. Switzerland's Carlo Janka leads from Austria's Romed Baumann and Norway's Aksel Lund Svindal, who was second in the downhill and gold medallist in the super-G. Defending champion Benjamin Raich is sixth. Britain's Andy Noble is 38th, Ed Drake 43rd and Dave Ryding 49th. Noble, who is 3.52 seconds off the lead, said: "It was an awesome feeling. It's the start of my first Olympic Winter Games, so I'm really stoked about it. I had a reasonable run. I'm happy with what I did and happy with my position." Drake, who is 4.38 seconds off the lead, said: "This is a bonus race for me. I've done my main races, so I can relax a bit more and enjoy it today." Ryding, who was 4.70 seconds behind the leader, said: "It wasn't a great run, but I'm pleased to get my first one of out of the way and I'm definitely looking to step it up in the next run." India's Jamyang Namgial, last of the 92 finishers, is 29.5 secs back.

Curling

1120: Canada send stones down the sheet to avoid getting into a mess. Britain put up a couple of guards, which Canada then clean out. British patience pays off as Canada make a small mistake and put a stone long to act as a guard for a scoring British stone. Going into the skips' stone, Britain lie two. Canada skip Cheryl Bernard takes out one, Eve Muirhead sticks another in there. Bernard delivers her last and takes out one of the British stones to lie one. Muirhead sends down the last stone and comes up with a good shot as she takes out the Canadian stone and scores two to narrow the gap to 5-4 with one end left. Canada have the hammer. In the crucial Switzerland v Germany, the Swiss lead 3-2 in the ninth end. even if Britain can pull off a win, they also need the Swiss to lose.


Curling

1100: British skip Eve Muirhead comes up short with her final stone and Canada take a 5-2 lead going into the ninth end. Muirhead gives a thousand-yard stare as she senses the game is up.

Nordic combined

1055: The men's nordic combined team competition is under way at Whistler Olympic Park. The format is four-man teams, one jump each with the overall team points turned into time. The first athlete from the leading team then starts the 5km relay with that time advantage, followed by the first athlete form the second place team and so on. Then it's a straight relay race. You can follow it al on our comprehensive live page.

1050: Eve Muirhead takes out the two scoring Canadian stones but agonisingly her own stone just slides out of the house. Canadian skip Cheryl Bernard delivers her last stone just behind the T line but Muirhead's shot for one goes long and Canada take a 4-2 lead against the hammer. Britain have the hammer in end eight but the game is slightly slipping away.

I've had a tweet from IanWalkerUK to say: "Just like to thank Steve Cram and Rhona Martin for their curling commentary, it's like Test Match Special on ice!" It's only a matter of time before they get sent cake in the commentary box. Maybe you could be first, Ian.

Alpine skiing

1040: In the men's giant slalom, Britain's Andy Noble, Ed Drake and Dave Ryding finish well outside the top 30. You can follow all the timings on our men's giant slalom live page.

Curling

1035: Eve Muirhead delivers the first of her stones in end six but can't quite squeeze into a scoring position. Canada lie one, with Britain second. Canada skip Cheryl Bernard puts in a short guard to protect her one, and Muirhead sends down a rocket to try for a multiple take-out. But she hits the Canadian guards and the home side take one to edge to 3-2. GB have the hammer in end seven.

1025: Hello, team. I'm beginning my spell from the gallery end this morning, and I bring you news that Bode Miller has crashed out on the first run of the men's giant slalom. The American, chasing an unprecedented fourth alpine skiing medal at a single Games, went all out from the start but lost his line and then got his shoulder caught in a control gate. That threw him off balance but he recovered that one, albeit with a big loss of time, only to miss another gate lower down. Swiss Carlo Janka still leads.


By Anna Thompson in Vancouver



1020: I'm off for a bit of a break but will be back later. Mr Rob Hodgetts is your man for the next stint.

Curling

1015: Danny on Twitter writes: "Hi there! What is the full set of results necessary for GB Women to qualify if they win? I'm assuming they're definitely out if not." You assume correctly, anon. There is a whole book we could write on what might happen in the curling, depending on certain results. But we're trying to keep things very simple for you - if GB's women lose here, they are absolutely, 100%, eliminated from the Olympics. If Switzerland's women win either of their two matches today, GB are eliminated no matter whether they win this current game or not. Shall we agree that, should GB win here and Switzerland also lose (the Swiss are currently 1-0 down to Germany) we will give you more detail? Otherwise it's a lot of theory, which might end up being redundant.

Mike Henke has also been contacting us via Twitter and he says: "Very unclassy for Canadian coach Dan Rafael to publicly criticise and abandon the Chinese curling team - that should be private!" Well Mike, he's still with them at the moment (but could move on after the Olympics) and his stern words seemed to have done the trick so far as they are up against the USA.

Curling

1010: We've reached the halfway stage in the curling and GB women and Canada are tied on 2-2 after five ends and are playing much better than they were earlier on. Remember GB need to win and hope Switzerland lose to Germany to have any hope of progressing. The Swiss are also drawing 1-1, while Sweden are 5-2 up against Japan and China, who were heavily criticised by their coach yesterday, lead USA 3-2.

Ice hockey

1005: There are four games in the men's ice hockey today - and it's starting to get serious. Four teams are already through to the knockout quarter-finals - USA, Russia, Sweden and Finland. They will be joined by the four winners of today's win-or-go-home play-offs. The one to watch is at 1630 local time, which is half past midnight in the UK. Canada, where hockey is less a pastime and more of a national obsession, see the gold medal in this competition as a minimum requirement, but after Sunday's embarrassing defeat by the US, they have to go through a qualifier just to get to the last eight. Underdogs Germany ought not to provide too stuff a test for the millionaire superstars of the NHL, but who knows ... That game is on red button TV and this website (UK users only). The first play-off game starts at midday local time (2000 GMT) and is between Switzerland and Belarus. Then it's the Canadians, and after that Czech Republic-Latvia and Slovakia-Norway. You can see how the draw is unfolding on our ice hockey results/schedule pages .

Alpine skiing

0955: The men's giant slalom is well under way and Swiss Carlo Janka leads at the moment, with Norway's Aksel Lund Svindal - aiming for a third medal of the Games - in contention, along with Austrians Romed Baumann, Marcel Hirscher and Benjamin Raich. Italian Massimiliano Blardone also put in a good first leg but Didier Cuche again looks out of sorts and is 1.48 seconds off the pace.

Curling

0950: That's more like it for GB women, they take two in the third to go 2-1 and all look a bit more happier with themselves.

Curling

0930: Canada steal one in the second end after an elementary error by Eve Muirhead, to give the 19-year-old's fragile confidence a further blow. The crowd are trying to gee her up by singing "Let's go Evie, let's go". BBC summariser Rhona Martin says the GB team "need to keep talking to her to keep her confidence up." In the other matches, Germany, who the Brits need a favour from, are 0-0 with Switzerland, China are beating the US and Sweden lead Japan 2-1. Keep up to date with our live stats

0910: What are looking forward to most today? As well as curling and GS there is women's ski cross at 1030 (1830 GMT), the team event in nordic combined, men's ice hockey play-offs, ladies figure skating and the first two runs of the women's bobsleigh. As always we love your comments and views so get in touch with me via text on 81111 (UK) using OLYMPICS as your first word or +44 7786200666 (worldwide) or tweet me. It's much more fun for everyone, so get involved.

Curling

0905: The pipe band has led the teams in at Vancouver Olympic Centre and GB skip Eve Muirhead says: "Let's finish on a good note". The match is under way against Canada with GB securing the hammer in the first end.

Alpine skiing

0850: Also coming up early doors is the men's giant slalom from Whistler Creekside. The first run is at 0930 (1730 GMT) and there are 103 starters, I kid you not. It's a wide open field but the Austrians are strong in the technical disciplines so look out for Marcel Hirscher and Benjamin Raich. American Ted Ligety leads the World Cup standings this season so he will be a threat and Bode Miller will be looking for his fourth medal of the Games. The Brits are also out in force, with Andy Noble, Ed Drake and Dave Ryding in the mix and attempting to get into the top 30 from the first leg, as these will qualify for the second medal run.

0835: Well hello again. Day 12 of the Olympics is upon us and what have we got in store for you? Well the GB women's curlers will be saying goodbye to the Games if they lose to Canada. Eve Muirhead's team need to win and hope Switzerland lose to Germany to keep their faint hopes alive. The action starts at 0900 (1700 GMT) and we'll be right on it.



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Latest medal standings

# Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1. CAN 14 7 5 26
2. GER 10 13 7 30
3. USA 9 15 13 37
4. NOR 9 8 6 23
5. KOR 6 6 2 14
19. GBR 1 0 0 1

Full medal table


see also
Day-by-day guide to the Winter Olympics
26 Feb 10 |  Vancouver 2010


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