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Page last updated at 16:50 GMT, Tuesday, 16 February 2010

As it happened - Winter Olympics day five

(All times local. GMT -8)

To get involved text us your views & comments on 81111 (UK) using OLYMPICS as your first word or +44 7786200666 (worldwide). (Not all contributions can be used)

By Ollie Williams in Vancouver


2102: Wednesday is a big day for the American team: big names such as Lindsey Vonn (alpine skiing), Shaun White (half-pipe), Shani Davis (speed skating) and Apolo Anton Ohno (short track) are all competing. For Britain, Ben Kilner goes in the half-pipe, Sarah Lindsay and Elise Christie are in short track action, and both the men's and women's curling teams have fixtures. Not forgetting the action in Whistler, where Chemmy Alcott takes part in the women's downhill alongside Vonn, and Andrew Musgrave and Andrew Young compete in the men's cross-country individual sprint. Enjoy it!

2053: If you're wondering whether Evgeni Plushenko can hang on at the top of the men's figure skating, you'll have to wait until Thursday to find out, in the free skate. There are still three curling matches going on - which you can follow using our live results service - and Russia are set to face Latvia in the men's hockey in a few minutes, but this all but concludes my coverage for the night.

Figure skating

2045: The men's figure skating short programme concludes with Michal Brezina of the Czech Republic. Brezina, who has a bit of Home Alone-era Macaulay Culkin about him, nails his routine and is warmly received by the Pacific Coliseum crowd. He gets only 78.80 for his troubles though, and that impresses very few in the auditorium, least of all him.

Snowboarding

2035: My mole within the Canadian host broadcaster tells me Maelle Ricker - winner of snowboard cross gold for Canada earlier on - has reached their studios to an enormous ovation.

Figure skating

2031: Reigning world champion Evan Lysacek of the US emerges looking like an agitated cormorant in an all-black, feathery outfit. And it has to be said it's very effective, particularly given how incredibly expressive he is with his arms. Lysacek doesn't put a wing wrong and raises those arms to the sky in unbridled delight as his routine finishes. But the judges don't quite put him ahead of Evgeni Plushenko - he gets 90.30, below Plushenko's 90.85.

2019: Do excuse the quick non-Olympics-related aside, but you will recall we were discussing what does or does not constitute a sport. Some people say figure skating is, some say it isn't. Ditto curling. Well, at the top of the feed of sports news provided by various press agencies for the BBC, marked "urgent", is: "Sadie the Scottish Terrier wins at Westminster Kennel Club".

Back to the action. Evan Lysacek up next in the figure skating for the US.

Ice hockey

2011: And while we're going around the grounds it's Finland 2-1 China with six minutes left of the second period in the women's hockey. The Finns waited patiently for me to change channel and see how they were getting on, then scored. Kind of them.

Curling

2007: Curling update! I watched Canada's men sneak past Norway 7-6 at the beginning of the day here, and they are now back in action against Germany. It's 2-2 after four of 10 ends. That Kevin Martin of Canada looks like a wily operator - David Murdoch of Great Britain had better beware. Elsewhere it's China 0-1 France (3/10 ends) and US 1-1 Norway (4/10 ends).

Figure skating

2004: American Johnny Weir did far more than Eskimo kiss the ice there, he practically sent it a late Valentine's card. And indeed, there he is clutching a purple and black heart-shaped cushion with his name on it. That performance oozed a strange, slightly sleazy, neon-pink romance. The judges are bound to love it. Here we go: fifth with 82.10... I reckoned it'd get more. That boy is a character.

1959: Chan goes fifth with a season's-best 81.12, to rapturous applause from the crowd but a grimace from Chan himself.

1956: Not a great deal wrong with that from Patrick Chan, who is one of the few skaters not to have given the ice an Eskimo kiss in this session. But equally, Plushenko is not going to have nightmares about that. We await the score - the other big name still to go is American Evan Lysacek in around half an hour.

From Bradley via text: "Skating is definitely a sport, but curling isn't! You train for a sport and you practice a game. What sort of training do you need to do for curling?"

If you could buy cans of worms in Vancouver - and the supermarkets over here are certainly interestingly-stocked - I would have opened one there. Here comes Patrick Chan to perform on home ice at an Olympics for the first time...

1947: With regard to the penalty figure skaters receive for falling, Im_Partial on Twitter writes: "You have to have a maths degree, but they do get deducted on the first mark, base value-degree of execution, and Joubert was hit hard. Why do I know this? I don't. I looked it up on your excellent live results service."

It's so true. Patrick Chan for Canada is up next, as Italy's Samuel Contesti goes sprawling around on the floor in an effort to see what our live results service can do.

Ice hockey

1939: Sir Matthew Pinsent, of BBC Sport Winter Olympics reporting fame, has just returned with one of the pucks from this evening's Canada-Norway game held high above his head. For a four-times Olympic gold medallist in rowing, he looks ridiculously pleased with himself.

Figure skating

1936: The black-mittened Brian Joubert of France falls quite spectacularly in his routine, which is big news because he was a bit of a medal dark horse here. What I don't understand about figure skating is why falls are a mandatory one-point deduction but nothing more. It seems to reward trying something mind-blowing but failing miserably, over keeping it simple and executing it to perfection, when surely the latter is the higher achievement? Isn't it?

1931: I note, on my return, that we are still goalless between Finland and China. I also note that the text about Canada being the "Chelsea of hockey" has attracted quite a response. More on that shortly, but make sure you're settling down for the figure skating because you don't want to miss Patrick Chan inside the next half an hour.

1914: There's a break at the figure skating for the next 15 minutes, so the choice is between three curling matches, all in their first end, or the goalless draw between Finland and China in the women's hockey. All of which screams to me, "food break". Back shortly. I leave you with this from the BBC's Brent Pope at the ice hockey: "Canada's starting goalie dilemma has heightened after hometown boy Roberto Luongo shone for them tonight." Discuss.

Figure skating

1905: Stephane Lambiel of Switzerland, one of a gazillion figure skaters to come out of retirement for Vancouver 2010, only manages 84.63 and third place so far in the men's short programme. I say "only" - that score is still way ahead of most, but he looks on ruefully because it doesn't touch Evgeni Plushenko's 90.85 or Daisuke Takahashi's 90.25.

Curling

1902: Three more curling matches are just starting, for your visual pleasure if you live in the UK. Remember we have very swanky top-down visualisations of the curling to help you see how each end was won and lost, this one from GB 4-6 Sweden earlier today being an example.

Figure skating

1856: Indulge yourself in the full stats from Canada 8-0 Norway and then let's hot-foot it over to Pacific Coliseum for the men's figure skating. Back here at the live text cooler, it's been decided I shall be spending my morning at the British women's first curling match, against China. Excellent, I look forward to it.

Ice hockey

Darryl in Ewell texts: "Mistake by Mike Babcock not starting Iginla on the line with Crosby and Nash. That line, along with the Sharks' line (Thornton, Heatley and Marleau) give Canada a true one-two punch. Guess he won't make that mistake again."

Anonymous texts from Canadians: "It was not harsh to pull the Norwegian goalie - good move by their coach to ensure starting keeper holds his confidence. He and the Norway team have done well to stand up to our boys. Could be much worse. It will push Canada to step it up enough to send the Russians back on a plane and the Americans on a bus."

"Bullies from Canada? Get used to it. We don't dive in Canada like the Swedes or Finnish. Real hockey is in Canada. Our junior teams could beat most."

1848: Hat-trick for Jarome Iginla at the hockey... no, wait, they've given it to Rick Nash. The resident Canadian in this room is insistent it should've been given to Iginla and is demanding to know who the goal judge is. To be honest, at 8-0, I think we can spare the goal judge. And that is a final result.

Figure skating

1841: If you're thinking, 'Why isn't he mentioning the figure skating?', the answer is I will as soon as anything happens in it. At the moment Evgeni Plushenko's score is in a different league to anybody else. But, once the hockey finishes, I'll be building up to Patrick Chan's appearance. In the meantime follow it all either via live video in the UK, or in the greatest of detail via our live results service.

Alpine skiing

1838: The start list for Wednesday's women's downhill skiing shows US star Lindsey Vonn going 16th, while Britain's Chemmy Alcott will be the second skier to go. BBC Radio 5 live's Eleanor Oldroyd has been speaking to Alcott and she'll have a blog on our site soon.

Ice hockey

1835: 7-0. Getzlaf again. Incredibly scrappy goal, tapped in after the puck squeaked out from underneath Andre Lysenstoen, who can hardly be said to have improved matters in the Norwegian goal since Paal Grotnes' departure.

To help British football fans understand proceedings, from jariiik via text: "Canadians are bullies - if you want to see amazing ice hockey you go to Sweden, Finland and so on. Even though I'm not an Arsenal fan at all, I know they play the nicest football in the league. But who's first in the table? The bullies from Chelsea."

1828: Number two for Jarome Iginla and number six for Canada. At least this allows me to get his name right this time. Simple one-timer as Rick Nash sets him up. One suspects the Norwegians would quite like to go home now.

1826: 5-0 Canada as Dany Heatley's shot from the left rattles both posts (or pipes, if you want this in hockey terminology) before nestling in the Norwegian net.

1824: I am reliably informed that this is a photo of the Olympic ice hockey gold medal-winning team of 1936 - from Britain. Yes, Britain. The Canadians won silver and the US got bronze. Those were the days. (With thanks to @simonpartridge on Twitter.)

1821: Goal number four for Canada, Ryan Getzlaf turning smartly and finding the corner of Paal Grotnes' net with a smooth backhander. With that the Norwegians pull their goalie, which seems a tad harsh.

1817: Norway miss a pair of sitters so it stays 3-0 to Canada in the hockey. Still 17 minutes to go in the third period but the Norwegians probably needed to score then to have any chance of an unlikely comeback.

Figure skating

1809: Evgeni Plushenko is still streets ahead in the men's figure skating short programme - it's rather reminiscent of the way Shen and Zhao came out of the blocks in the pairs, posting a score nobody else got near until much later in the event. Remember Patrick Chan for Canada is coming up in about an hour and a half.

1758: If the Vancouver Games have inspired you to the point where you're desperate to visit a Winter Olympics, but don't fancy the Russian city of Sochi in 2014, then your candidates for 2018 are: Annecy in France, Munich in Germany and Pyeongchang in South Korea. Which is another way of saying there's not a lot going on in the hockey - 3-0 at the end of the second.

1753: Coming up before the day is out in Vancouver - three more curling round-robin games from 1900Van/0300UK and two more hockey matches, not least Russia against Latvia in the men's event. Which I suppose automatically makes the women's game between Finland and China least.

Figure skating

Anon via text: "Plushenko was amazing in his short programme. It's going to take a lot to beat him for gold!"

He was, indeed, pretty spectacular. I got to see Shen and Zhao win pairs gold on Monday and that was sensational too. On a separate note, it's been pointed out I accidentally called Jarome Iginla "Jerome" earlier. Duly corrected, but it's his parents' fault for going for that spelling.

Ice hockey

1745: Michael Richards gets Canada's third unanswered goal from close range midway through the second period but, watching that back, I reckon Norwegian goaltender Paal Grotnes should have done better. Richards got a second opportunity he probably didn't deserve.

1741: Norway have got a five-on-three power play for the next 48 seconds. As good a chance as they are going to get in this game.

Figure skating

1739: People are still trying to start arguments with me on Twitter about whether figure skating should count as a sport or not. Read my views on the matter on my blog and leave me a comment. Definitely a sport. Definitely.

Ice hockey

1737: If you're Norway, what score do you now settle for?

Figure skating

1735: At the figure skating, Evgeni Plushenko dazzles in a sleek black and silver number on the Pacific Coliseum ice. Forty-six years of Russian dominance in the pairs event came to an end with China's win on Monday, but Plushenko looks more than capable of defending his Olympic men's singles title. He racks up a mammoth 90.85 score, more than 15 points clear of anyone else, to go top.

Ice hockey

1732: Looks to me like Canadian bad boy Dany Heatley gets an excellent touch on a Chris Pronger shot to send Canada 2-0 up. You can reach out and touch the relief in Canada Hockey Place: Canada are on their way.

1728: There we go. Jarome Iginla rifles home for Canada. Looked like it may have taken the slightest of deflections but it was a lovely pass from Sidney Crosby to give him the room for the shot. Norway finally crumble, just as the Canadians in the BBC live text cooler were starting to take some serious stick.

From peaceism via Twitter: "The 0-0 Canada-Norway score isn't surprising, with Canada only having one practice. Remember they got crushed by the Swedes in 2002 opener, 5-2."

Figure skating

1724: Canada and Norway are back in action in the second period. Brent Pope, part of the BBC commentary team, says the crowd around him are unsettled after that rusty opening. Meanwhile, Canada's Vaughn Chipeur is in action in the men's figure skating short programme going on at Pacific Coliseum. Russia's Evgeni Plushenko, one of the biggest names in the event, is up next.

Ice hockey

Tom in Guildford texts: "As an ice hockey fan I've been asked a few times this week why we don't have a team competing in these Games. As great as our Brits are, if this Canadian team faced us we'd be on the wrong end of an 18-0 scoreline like the Slovakian women were."

And Tom is correct. Britain has men's and women's teams who are working incredibly hard to raise the standard of hockey in the UK, but it is going to take quite a lot of time before the Olympics is even a remote prospect.

Curling

1716: All four women's curling matches that were taking place over the past few hours have finished. In your finest James Alexander Gordon voice, now (if you're not from the UK, look him up):
United States 7-9 Japan
Germany 9-5 Russia
Denmark 5-6 Sweden
Canada 5-4 Switzerland

Ice hockey

1710: Forgive me, for I knew not what I did when I posted that text about the Sheffield varsity hockey match. Half the universities in the country have now been in touch claiming theirs is larger. Nottingham would like it known that the University beat Trent in a shoot-out after it finished 6-6 on Monday. A sell-out 7,000 crowd, apparently - roughly a third of the capacity of Canada Hockey Place. Impressive.

1707: That wraps up the first period and what a boost for Norway to still be on level terms. (By the way, Craig in Glasgow advises me that Ole-Kristian Tollefsen - who I had down as Norway's only NHL player - was dropped to the second-tier AHL not long ago, so they're minus any NHL talent.) These passionate Canadian fans will have to wait to cheer their first goal of the tournament.
1703: Ooooh, almost an opener for Sidney Crosby but Norwegian goalie Paal Grotnes gets a solid glove on it. "He's playing a blinder here, keeping them in it," says our reporter Matt Pinsent, who has the privilege of being inside the arena for this one.

1700: Norway survive heavy pressure while penalty-killing and even sneak a shot in, for what would have been an unlikely short-handed goal, although Roberto Luongo is more than equal to it in the Canadian net. If you can't watch this live - or even if you can - you can get comprehensive real-time statistics via our live results pages. If I had that for my English Premier League ice hockey commentaries, we can safely say life would be a little easier.

1655: First power play for the Canadians as Tommy Jakobsen goes into the penalty box for hooking. For the uninitiated, that means Canada have an extra man on the ice for the next two minutes, and Norway will do well to survive this.

Neil in Milton Keynes texts: "I'm an NHL and Pittsburgh Penguins fan. Ovechkin and Crosby are rightly mentioned as star players, but don't forget Russian Evgeni Malkin, he's quality. Going to be one hell of a tournament!"

Nic in Sheffield texts: "No ice hockey match at these Olympics will be as big as this weekend's winter varsity match between Sheffield University and Hallam University. Unless the US, Canada and Russia get on the ice at once. At the same time as the curlers. And the ice dancers."

This sort of outlook may be why Britain never gets a team to the Olympics...

1647: Norway have dealt with Canada fairly well so far, but you'd imagine they'll tire as this goes on. A few of you have texted to say you hope the smaller teams at the Games avoid humiliating defeats - I can't see Norway getting that much of a pasting, but in the women's tournament, Russia have gone down 13-0 to the US.

Snowboarding

1644: Britain's Zoe Gillings (eighth in snowboard cross): "Something in my left knee went in the semi-final and pure adrenaline kept me going. I'm not sure what I would have done if I had been in the final. The lure of an Olympic medal would have been immense but my knee would not been able to have withstood it."

Ice hockey

rafamoroni via Twitter: "Do Norway have any NHL players?"

As far as I'm aware, their only NHL star is defenceman Ole-Kristian Tollefsen, who was traded to Detroit from Philadelphia earlier this month.

1634: On a scale of one to 10, one being not at all, how sad is it to describe live texting a Canadian Olympic hockey game as a dream come true? Here we go!

1633: It is fair to say that the number of texts and tweets is going stratospheric with the advent of the Canada-Norway hockey game.

Tom in Leeds texts: "The Russians will be a tough nut to crack with Alex Ovechkin and Ilya Kovalchuk leading their offence. Going to mention the Finnish team as a potential dark horse, great keeper in Mikka Kiprusoff and good attacking players in Oli Jokinen and Teemu Selanne providing the firepower."

Trevor in Newbury texts: "I think we can expect big game players in Iginla and Crosby, with a tough Pronger at the back. Not to mention that Luongo may be the best GK in this Games. Prediction tonight is 4-2 to Canada."

1628: Wow. It's a sea of red and white inside Vancouver's Canada Hockey Place, which is, er, the place to be for Canada hockey. The Canadian men are about to take to the ice for the first time at this Olympic Games, facing the relatively unfancied Norwegians (who themselves admit they're not overly good at hockey). Should be an easy Canadian win, but it's well worth watching to see how the team is looking, including stars like Sidney Crosby, Chris Pronger and (my personal favourite) Jonathan Toews. Are you watching? Text your thoughts on the men's Olympic hockey tournament (81111 in the UK or +44 7786200666 worldwide) or send a tweet to @bbcsport_ollie if you prefer.

Figure skating

1623: The men's figure skating short programme is about to begin, and the focus is on two athletes: Russia's Evgeni Plushenko is defending his world title, and Canada's Patrick Chan is an immensely popular home challenger for gold. Watch it live if you're in the UK, and we also have all the scores in full detail (including a full breakdown of each routine) via our live results service.

Ice hockey

Dan - "from Russia, with love" - texts: "The Russians are going to destroy the Canadians yet again in the hockey, like they did in the World Championships. In Alex Ovechkin they possess the best player in the world."

Results

1612: GOLD for Tatjana Huefner. She's immediately half a second ahead and doesn't go a millimetre wrong, soaring around the final bend to take gold by a whopping distance. Huefner kneels down and kisses the ice. Germany are dominating the luge - Felix Loch won the men's event earlier in the Games.

Luge

1609: Coming up, a Russian texter takes it to the whole of Canada regarding the men's hockey. Steel yourselves, Canadians. In the meantime we're reaching medal territory in the luge and Austria's Nina Reithmayer leads with just one athlete to go: Tatjana Huefner of Germany.

Speed skating

1605: GOLD for South Korea's Lee Sang-Hwa in the women's 500m speed skating at the Richmond Olympic Oval. She swings round the outside bend and finishes within a hundredth of a second of Jenny Wolf of Germany. That, added to their first runs, gives Lee overall victory by five hundredths. Blink and you would literally miss that. Third gold medal of the games for South Korea.

1600: The women's singles luge is reaching a climax, we'll have a gold medal in the next 10 or 15 minutes with just a few competitors left. Meanwhile, at the speed skating, Wang Beixing has taken the lead but the two favourites are about to go in the final heat. Drama.

1554: Russia's Yulia Nemaya falls and goes clattering into the boards at the Richmond Olympic Oval. Here's the full list of times so far if you want to watch it live (provided you're in the UK) and need to catch up.

1551: Veeery very close to a speed skating gold medal now. Four pairs to go and America's Heather Richardson has just gone top.

Snowboarding

1547: Hark! News fresh from Cypress Mountain, brought to us courtesy of Anna Thompson of this parish. She has spoken to Britain's Zoe Gillings who finished eighth in the snowboard cross, having pulled up at the start gate in the small final. Gillings confirms our suspicions that she hurt her foot, and limped out of the start gate just to make sure she registered eighth place. A sad way to end her Olympic quest. Meanwhile, there are sporadic outbursts of the Canadian national anthem here in downtown Vancouver now that they have two gold medallists on the board.

Ice hockey

1540: Speaking of hockey, the US women are now 9-0 up over Russia. Very reminiscent of Guildford Flames v Romford Raiders on a Saturday night at the Spectrum. If that means nothing to you, and you live in the UK, then be ashamed and start watching your local hockey team.

Anon via text: "I'm hoping for big things from Canada's men's hockey team. Their third and fourth lines would be first lines on pretty much every other nation's team."

Please don't forget to give me your name if you're texting. Then I can hold you to your views when the Norwegians win 8-0.

Curling

1531: If curling spins your stone, that same live results service can keep you on top of all the matches currently taking place. For example, this page gives you blow-by-blow diagrams from Denmark v Sweden in the women's tournament. The same is available for every other fixture, including Britain's matches in the coming days.

Speed skating

1527: Pictures of huge crowds dressed in orange while jumping up and down can only mean the Dutch, which can only mean speed skating. There are nine pairs to go before we get a gold medallist in the women's 500m. Watch live online if you're in the UK or follow all the action in stats using our comprehensive live results service (with which I am in love).

Biathlon

1522: Anthony Walker has read my mind. He seems, by process of osmosis, to have realised I was about to recap today's biathlon medallists, and texts in to advise that "both races were exciting and went down to the final shoot". I do note, however, that my tip for gold - Jay Hakkinen, perhaps a bit ambitious given the American was about as far out of contention as Eddie the Eagle is at this year's ski jump - came nowhere. Bjorn Ferry, crazy Swedish biathlete with the superbly-named "Ferry Tales" website, won men's 12.5km pursuit gold, and Germany's Magdalena Neuner won the women's 10.5km pursuit.

Snowboarding

1515: Cypress Mountain is proving a happy hunting ground for Canadians after Alexandre Bolideau's moguls gold the other night. Switzerland's Olivia Nobs managed to haul herself over the line for bronze, by the way.

Results

1512: GOLD for Canada as 31-year-old Maelle Ricker has a Jacobellis-style lap of honour in her home town, let alone her home country, after her rivals crash out. She nearly loses it once or twice but clings on, and France's Deborah Anthonioz picks her way through the debris for silver.

Snowboarding

1507: I always think "small final" is a funny name for this - but anyway, this is the women's snowboard cross race to decide fifth to eighth place, starring Zoe Gillings of Great Britain. But her start is horrible, and she doesn't even bother going more than 10 yards. What a disaster - we think maybe a foot injury in her semi-final meant she couldn't really compete. Think we can safely say that's eighth for her then, while Lindsey Jacobellis, whose heart can't be in this, wins to take fifth. She will not be celebrating either. Woe, woe, woe.

Ice hockey

1503: I'm sticking with snowboard cross, but BBC commentator Brent Pope is down at the ice hockey. "1980 Lake Placid US hockey legend Mike Eruzione is in the house," he tells me. Ah, the miracle on ice - go and read about it, one of the greatest sporting fixtures of all time. Afraid the women's US-Russia game isn't quite the same legendary spectacle, though. The US are hammering Russia 4-0. Check out Jenny Potter's goal for the US if you can. Very special.

Snowboarding

1453: Lindsey Jacobellis is out! She goes through one of the side gates and again, her Olympic dream is crushed. She's gliding down the mountain slowly and solemnly as the semi-final carries on ahead of her. Glad I'm not about to interview Jacobellis after that... what would you say? Jacobellis will face Gillings in the small final to decided fifth to eighth.

1449: Here we go with the women's snowboard cross semi-finals then - we've only just had the quarter-finals but the action on Cypress Mountain is fast and furious. Britain's Zoe Gillings is at the back from the start but Mellie Francon drops out to push her up to third. She needs top two though, and really needs one of the front two to drop out. Alas, she can't catch them, and out of the Winter Olympics she goes.

Snowboarding

1443: American Lindsey Jacobellis wins her snowboard cross quarter-final with some ease as she bids to avenge the terrible fate which befell her in 2006. Jacobellis and Gillings in the final would be a tasty prospect indeed.

Ice hockey

1440: Women's ice hockey between Russia and the United States has just started but all the focus is on Canada's men later on. If you're in the UK, are you staying up to watch? I know I'll be glued to it. Canada should - in fact, must - win gold, because as they keep reminding themselves, it is their game. Simple as that. The nation will be reduced to a weeping mess otherwise.

Snowboarding

1432: Zoe Gillings has a very tough quarter-final in the snowboard cross but gets a superb start, and Austria's Maria Ramberger disappears soon after. Switzerland's Simona Meiler closes the gap on Gillings, but she hangs on to advance to the semis alongside Mellie Francon of Switzerland. Blimey. That eased me in nicely, then.

1427: Hello everybody. This promises to be a most entertaining few hours. Here is your menu:

- Women's snowboard cross sees Britain's Zoe Gillings still in the hunt for a medal after a useful first run in qualifying earlier.
- Women's singles luge where Germany's Tatjana Hufner leads the way with one run remaining, starting in about five minutes.
- There are four women's curling matches just starting here in Vancouver, with the men returning later.
- Canada's men take on Norway in the ice hockey in a couple of hours' time.
- The men's figure skating short programme starts at Pacific Coliseum at around the same time.
- And the women's 500m speed skating is under way at the Richmond Olympic Oval too.

By Rob Hodgetts

1420: Team, thanks for your company. I'm going to hand over to Ollie Williams who will guide you through the afternoon's action. Have fun.

Snowboarding

1410: Britain's Zoe Gillings qualifies in eighth place for the four-rider elimination rounds of the women's snowboard cross. Switzerland's Mellie Francon was fastest, followed by Lindsey Jacobellis and Canada's Maelle Ricker. Canada's Dominique Maltais, who made the final in Turin four years ago, crashed in both qualification runs and will not qualify.

You can follow all the times on our live snowboard cross qualifying page.

In the men's ice hockey opener, USA beat Switzerland 3-1.

Luge

1405: Germany's Tatjana Huefner holds a 0.268 second lead over Austrian Nina Reithmayer going into the final run of the women's luge. Germany's Natalie Geisenberger is third, 0.293 back.

You can follow the luge on our live timing page.

Ice hockey

1355: In the men's ice hockey it's USA 3-1 Switzerland in the third period after a power-play goal from Roman Wick.

You can follow all the updates on USA v Switzerland on our live page.



Snowboarding

1345: One of the big pre-event favourites Dominique Maltais, of Canada, crashes again on her second qualification run and will not progress to the elimination rounds. Compatriot Maelle Ricker, leader of the World Cup standings, is also under pressure after a fall in run one but makes it down to complete a timed run and goes third. Britain's Zoe Gillings begins her second run in eighth but misjudges a jump and is forced to do a somersault to avoid a more serious crash. Her previous run should be enough to qualify.

The women's 500m speed skating is under way at the Riichmond Oval just outside downtown Vancouver. You can follow the speed skating updates on our live timing page.

Snowboarding

1335: Switzerland's Mellie Francon is fastest after the first timed qualifying run of the women's snowboard cross. American Lindsey Jacobellis is second, with Britain's Zoe Gillings fifth. The 24 starters will have one more run in which to improve on their time, with the top 16 going into the four-rider heats for the elimination rounds.

You can follow all the times on our live snowboard cross qualifying page.

1328: Andrew Corcoran makes a great point on Twitter, which we should have remembered to say. If you're in the UK and on the 'high web' as we call it, rather than than our mobile site, you can follow the link on the right of this page, underneath the medals table, and watch the feeds being offered by other European broadcasters, at least one of which will be showing the USA hockey game which we are not. Enjoy their coverage - we can offer it because we are all part of the European Broadcasting Union. We have the Canada game at midnight, though, remember (1600 local time).

Results

1322: Sweden's Bjorn Ferry wins GOLD in the men's 12.5km biathlon pursuit. It's the 31-year-old's first Olympic medal. Austria's Christophe Sumann is 16 seconds adrift in second with individual gold medallist Vincent Jay of France third, 28 seconds back. Norway's Ole Einar Bjoerndalen, vyving for a sixth Olympic gold, came seventh, 51.4 seconds behind.

In the men's ice hockey it's USA 3-0 Switzerland at the end of the second period.

You can follow all the updates on USA v Switzerland on our live page.

Luge

1305: Run three of the women's luge competition is under way at Whistler, with Germany's Tatjana Huefner leading and looking set to emulate countryman Felix Loch, who won the men's event.

You can follow all the latest on our live luge page.

Snowboarding

1300: Britain's Zoe Gillings is pushed down to fifth fastest two thirds of the way through the first qualifying run for women's snowboard cross but a number of the big favourites have fallen.

You can follow all the qualifying times on our live snowboard cross qualifying page.

Hockey fans , it's USA 3-0 Switzerland early in the second period after David Backes and Ryan Malone score. You can also follow all the updates on USA v Switzerland on our live page.

Curling

1255: British curling skip David Murdoch has shrugged off the world champions' opening 5-4 loss to European champions Sweden. "Pretty much every championship I've been in I've lost the first game. It's the norm for us. It's a long week here and the goal is to get the semi-final. Whether that's in first fourth place, I don't care," he said.

1245: The men's 12.5km biathlon pursuit is under way with surprise individual winner Vincent Jay of France leading off. Norway's Ole Einar Bjoerndalen, striving for a sixth Olympic gold, begins more than a minute behind after poor shooting saw him finish 17th in the individual. Britain's Lee Jackson was 55th in the individual, securing a start as one of the top 60.

Scott in Northern Ireland via text to 81111, and Epoch157 on Twitter asks me, @RobHodgetts , "why the BBC are not showing the USA/Switzerland Ice Hockey?! It's he best thing they could show! I'm so upset." The answer to that is that we have enough bandwidth to offer five streams currently - the BBC Two coverage, the luge, the snowboarding, the biathlon and speed skating - so unfortunately we will not be offering the USA hockey game. But, guys, we will be offering the first appearance of the host nation Canadians in their game against Norway at midnight in the UK (1600 local time) and the later game involving Latvia and fancied Russia.

Snowboarding

1236: Canada's second big hope in the women's snowboard cross, Dominique Maltais, also crashes out on her first timed run. American Lindsey Jacobellis, who so famously fell with the gold in sight in Turin, makes it down 1.8 seconds faster than Britain's Zoe Gillings to take the lead.

Ice hockey

1232: Goal from Bobby Ryan gives USA a 1-0 lead over Switzerland in the men's ice hockey opener. That's the end of the first period.

1222: Britain's Zoe Gillings gets down safely in her first timed qualification run in the women's snowboard cross at Cypress Mountain. She crosses the line in thick fog and is 1.53 seconds faster than the only other woman down so far, Sandra Frei. Current World Cup leader Maelle Ricker is next and crashes near the top of the course. She gets back up but comes home 15 seconds adrift of Gillings. She'll have one more run to get in a decent time to qualify.

You can follow all the qualifying times on our live snowboard cross qualifying page.

Hockey fans - you can also follow all the updates on USA v Switzerland on our live page.
Snowboarding

1212: Switzerland's Sandra Frei gets qualification under way before Alexandra Jekova, down next, crashes out. She will have to rely on her second run. Britain's Zoe Gillings is third in the starting gate but more low could drifts over the course and organisers call a temporary halt.

Snowboarding

1200: Cypress Mountain is blanketed by thick fog which has caused a two-hour delay to the start of the timed qualification rounds. But they are now under way. There are 24 starters, with the 16 fastest riders - based on their best time from one of two runs - going through to the four-rider knockout heats.
You can also follow all the qualifying times on our live snowboard cross qualifying page.

Curling

1150: In other curling results, Canada and Norway went to an 11th end in a tense opener before home skip Kevin Martin clinched victory with the final stone to win 7-6. Switzerland beat Denmark 6-5 and Germany beat USA 7-5.

1145: Coming up at 1200 (2000 GMT) is the delayed women's snowboard cross qualifying, plus USA v Switzerland in the men's ice hockey opener.

Curling

1135:Sweden beat Great Britain 5-4 in the opening match of the men's curling competition. "Britain did not play well this morning. The Swedes read the ice very well from the beginning," says BBC commentator Steve Cram.

Curling

1130: A tense finish coming up in the GB v Sweden curling match. Just a few stones left. "Certainly in the last few ends GB have made Sweden play a lot more shots and they are just hoping for that little error," says BBC commentator Rhona Martin. "But Sweden have not done a lot wrong this morning and it's half shots that could have cost Britain the game."

Curling

1125: British skip David Murdoch produces a big shot when it really matters and knocks the two Swedish stones out of the house to score two for his side and narrow the gap to 5-4 with one end left. Sweden have the hammer - the last stone - in the final end.

1115: From Henry Whitfield on Twitter: The Canadians around me are loving Murdoch being behind! But we know the old farmer has a trick or two up his sleeve!

Curling

1105: Sweden score two to take a 5-2 lead against Great Britain after the eighth end in the men's curling. "Great Britain just need to sharpen up on a few shots," says 2002 Olympic champion and BBC commentator Rhona Martin, who tells us she is so cold she's wearing gloves, but has to keep taking them off to use the telestrator (the pen thing that lets you draw on the screen).

Biathlon

1100: GOLD for Germany's Magdalena Neuner, the individual silver medallist, after she overhauls individual champion Anastazia Kuzmina in the women's 10km biathlon pursuit. Neuner began 1.5 seconds behind Kuzmina but raced to a 12.3-second victory over the Slovakian. "This is sheer class and she's earned every single ounce of that Olympic gold medal," says bouncy BBC commentator Rob Walker. Kuzmina takes silver with Marie-Laure Brunet, who shot clean, in third.

Biathlon

1050: Up at Whistler, Germany's Magdalena Neuner, the individual silver medallist, leads from individual Olympic champion Anastazia Kuzmina after the third shooting section of the women's 10km pursuit biathlon.

Curling

1045: British skip David Murdoch squeezes his last stone into the blue circle to beat the Swedish stone by centimetres to close the gap to 3-2 down. Other scores: Canada 5-4 Norway Germany 4-3 USA, Switzerland 6-1 Denmark.

1035: By the way, if you are struggling to get your head around some of the curling terminology, we can heartily recommend the website trycurling.co.uk , which has more information than you could shake a stone at.

1025: Sweden take a two-shot lead at 3-1 against Great Britain's men after six ends in the curling.

Dan from Dudley texts: "Looking forward to settling down and watching the women's snowboard cross later this evening. Last night's men's was fantastic!" It was Dan, it was. But you'll have to wait a bit longer. Qualifying will start around 2000 GMT and will be on the Red Button in the UK. The final, if it goes ahead today, should be on BBC 2 from about 2315 GMT.

Curling

1010: Halfway in the men's curling opener between Great Britain and Sweden and David Murdoch's men trail 2-1 after the GB skip blanks the fifth end. "So far for Sweden it's been a very good start," says BBC commentator Steve Cram. "They'll be excited how things have gone for them. Britain have just struggled to find their shots." Other scores: Canada 5-1 Norway, Germany 3-3 USA, Switzerland 2-0 Denmark.

Kristian in Ascot via text: "As regards the all in one ski suit question (see 0925) ... Bond pulls off an orange number in the beginning of the Spy Who Loved Me. I'd give respect to anyone who followed in those glorious footsteps!"

Mightyscoop Tweets us to say: "Which event do you think has the prospect of being the closest/most exciting of the games? Surely nothing beats snowboard cross!"

Well, Mightyscoop, the women's snowboard cross will obviously be fascinating given what happened last time when Lindsey Jacobellis snatched defeat from not just the jaws but the throat and stomach of victory. But skier cross makes its debut (men 21 Feb, women - 23 Feb) and could be even more exciting. The big buzz here in Canada surrounds men's hockey, and should Canada get to the final the whole country will come to a standstill. And from a British point of view, there could be some very tense late nights/early mornings if either curling team goes on a run to the final. UK viewers, start stockpiling your coffee supplies.

Biathlon

1005: Coming up at 1030 we have women's 10km biathlon pursuit. The top 60 finishers in the individual qualified and will go in ranking order, so Slovakian gold medallist Anastazia Kuzmina will go first with a 1.5 second head start over silver medallist Magdalena Neuner.

Curling

1000: David Murdoch clears the last Swedish stone in the house to blank the end, so Britain still trail 2-1 after four ends. Other scores: Canada 3-1, Germany 3-1 USA, Switzerland 1-0 Denmark.

0945: Great Britain slip 2-1 behind Sweden after end three. Crucially, they have last stone advantage in end four. I should just mention the strides that Norway are sporting on the adjacent sheet - white, red and blue diamond check. Very John Daly.

Separately, I've done a bit of commentator's curse I'm afraid. No sooner do I write that last entry than news reaches me that women's snowboard cross qualifying is now delayed for two hours. So that takes it to 2000 GMT, or 1200 here in Canada.

0940: So a reminder that the snowboard cross which features an outside chance at a medal for Team GB in the shape of Zoe Gillings has been postponed for an hour because of fog at Cypress Mountain, and will now start at 1900 GMT in the UK, which is 1100 here in Vancouver. That should allow you to watch a bit of this curling at the office, then scoot home and get BBC Two on in case Gillings snatches glory. Well you wouldn't want to miss a GB medal, would you? Even if Zoe doesn't get a medal, you could catch an astonishing finish like the one they had in the snowboard cross four years ago at the 2006 Winter Games.


Curling

0930: Great Britain take a 1-0 lead after end two of this 10-end match against Sweden. Scores on the adjacent sheets: Canada 3-0 Norway , USA 1-1 Germany, Switzerland 0-0 Denmark.

0925: Right, this just is not going to work without you. So you need to send me your thoughts on 81111 if you are in the UK; +44 7786200666 if you are elsewhere. Or if you use Twitter, go on and send me a Tweet . For instance, an anonymous texter just got in touch to ask: "I need some fashion advice. Are all in one ski suits back in fashion?"

The answer to that, of course, is 'Don't be so ridiculous. Sag bags will never be cool'. And yet, some of the hip young things out there, and boarders, can now occasionally be seen sporting low-crotched all-in-ones in single colours, say, purple or lime green in a post-ironic, uber trendy way. It's not a look anyone can pull off, though, so be careful. You'll either look super cutting edge, or 89 years old.

Curling

0920: GB skip David Murdoch blanks the end with his final stone to retain the hammer into the second end. That means he knocked the last Swedish stone out of the house and Britain will go last in the next end.

Just to mark your card, other curling matches taking place this morning at the Vancouver Olympic Centre are Norway against Olympic champions Canada, USA v Germany and Switzerland v Denmark.

0910: Want to get yourself in the mood for GB's curlers beginning their campaign? Want to prepare for Rhona Martin's commentary debut by re-living her gold medal winning 'stone of destiny' from 2002? Well, you can watch that golden moment on on our website.

0900: David Murdoch's Britain go into this competition as world champions but their first match is a tough task against a young Swedish outfit who are European champions.
Just as a refresher you can remind yourself how it all works with our curling guide.

Quick snowboard cross update - qualifying delayed by an hour because of thick fog up at Cypress. So it's now set to begin at 1100 (1900 GMT).

Curling

0855: Chatting to us here in the Beeb Bunker earlier this week, Rhona Martin, the 2002 gold medal-winning GB skip, told us she reckons Britain could win two medals in the curling competition at the Games.

Curling

0850: BBC Sport's commentary team for the Curling is a pair of Olympic medallists - Steve Cram who won silver in the 1500m in Los Angeles in 1984 and Rhona Martin who of course was the skip when Team GB took curling gold in Salt Lake City eight years ago. Steve and Rhona are in position at the Vancouver Olympic Centre.

Steve Cram, just before going on air, told us: "Extraordinary journey to the venue today - we had to give directions to the media bus driver and even when we arrived I'm not sure the venue was ready for us. The catering staff must have slept in as there was no coffee!"

Rhona Martin tells us: "At last curling is finally going to start and I'm looking forward to my debut as a BBC commentator. I hope I sound as knowledgable as all the other presenters and commentators on the BBC Winter Olympics team."

0845: Morning/evening all and welcome to day five of the Winter Olympics. It's a grey day in Vancouver and snowing heavily up at Whistler, so the men's super-combined has been postponed, probably until Friday. The action will kick off with Great Britain's men opening their campaign against Sweden.

Women's snowboard cross qualifying takes place at Cypress Mountain from 1000 (1800 GMT), with the final session from 1215. Could it be redemption day for Lindsey Jacobellis, the American who fell in sight of gold in Turin? Zoe Gillings is Britain's big hope. There's also biathlon, women's luge, more curling (GB women start on Wednesday), men's figure skating, women's 500m speed skating and the much anticipated opener for Canada's men's hockey team, who play Norway at 1630 (0030 GMT). You can check out our day-to-day guide for a full run down of what's on.

So settle down for a big day of winter sports. Should be a cracker

.

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see also
Ricker cruises to snowboard gold
16 Feb 10 |  Snowboarding
Miller set for first Olympic gold
21 Feb 10 |  Vancouver 2010
Neuner gains revenge in pursuit
16 Feb 10 |  Biathlon
Ferry swoops to pursuit victory
16 Feb 10 |  Biathlon
GB curlers suffer Sweden setback
16 Feb 10 |  Curling


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