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  Monday, 28 October, 2002, 14:54 GMT
F1 rejects radical change
FIA president Max Mosley
Mosley's more radical ideas have been rejected
Formula One bosses have shied away from making radical changes to the sport.

But they have agreed to amend qualifying, the rule on team orders and the points system in an attempt to make it more exciting.

The more radical options on the agenda were all voted down.


It seems what we are doing is likely to produce a significant change
FIA president
Max Mosley

These had included proposals for drivers to swap teams during the season and for ballast to be added to cars corresponding to the amount of championship points scored.

"It is a fine line between not doing anything and not doing too much," said FIA president Max Mosley on Monday.

"On balance, it seems what we are doing is likely to produce a significant change."

The changes agreed for 2003 are as follows:

  • The single one-hour session on a Saturday has been abandoned in favour of two one-hour sessions - one each on Friday and Saturday. Cars will go out one at a time for single flying laps.

  • The points system will change in a bid to keep the championship open for as long as possible and to award points down to eighth place rather than sixth.

    The new system awards 10 points for a win, and will then go eight, six, five, four, three, two and one.

  • Team orders that affect race results have been banned.

  • The Belgian Grand Prix has been struck off the calendar because of a row over tobacco advertising.

  • Tyre companies will be allowed to custom-make tyres for each team they supply.

The desire to make changes had come after Ferrari's domination of the 2002 season led to a decline in TV viewing figures.

They amount to a compromise between the desire for an upheaval to inject new life into F1 and a wish to keep F1 true to its original spirit.

The changes to qualifying and team orders are the biggest shift from the past.

F1 had two-day qualifying as recently as 1995, but this is the first time drivers will go out one at a time.

Under the new system, the cars will run in championship order on Friday.

The fastest driver on Friday will then go out last on Saturday.

Next year will also be the first time that a team running first and second will not be able to decide which of their drivers wins.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC Five Live's Jonathan Legard
"Ferrari will have to work harder"
Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone
"We hope the changes will liven things up"
FIA president Max Mosley
"We've achieved more than expected"

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Jonathan Legard

Rob Bonnet

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See also:

28 Oct 02 | Formula One
28 Oct 02 | Formula One
14 Oct 02 | Formula One
22 Oct 02 | Formula One
28 Oct 02 | Formula One
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