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  Saturday, 12 October, 2002, 09:30 GMT 10:30 UK
Mosley expects changes
Michael Schumacher on his way to pole position at the Japanese Grand Prix
Ferrari's domination is damaging the sport's popularity
Motorsport boss Max Mosley believes handicapping stands a better chance of being introduced in Formula One next season than his own idea of drivers swapping teams.

Both are included in a radical nine-point plan of proposed changes to be discussed by the F1 Commission, the sport's rule-making body, at a meeting later this month.

Mosley - president of the sport's governing body, the FIA - said: "My particular favourite, but I think the teams are unlikely to accept, is the driver swap.

"One thing much more likely is Bernie's idea of a kilo a point, that might go through."


We have never had a problem like this before
Max Mosley

Mosley, who has a vote on the Commission along with F1 ringmaster Bernie Ecclestone, added: "If I had my way, I would say we have got to have one of them.

"The reality is it could be neither or it could be one, but quite clearly you could not have both as that would be unfair."

Mosley has warned the team bosses that F1 has to act to stem viewing figures.

These have declined this season because of Ferrari's superiority and the controversy in Austria when Rubens Barrichello was ordered to move over for Michael Schumacher.

"We have never had a problem like this before," Mosley said.

"Maybe it's because people got spoiled. In five years out of seven we had the last race as the deciding one which is complete luck.

Max Mosley, FIA president
Mosley believes something has to be done
"The problem is Ferrari have done a brilliant job and Williams and McLaren haven't done quite well enough and still less Renault, Jaguar so on.

"When you are confronted with a problem like a falling television audience you should react.

"It is no good sitting there thinking they are all mad, they shouldn't switch the television off.

"At the beginning of the season the viewing figures were holding up pretty well. Then we had the Austrian incident when a lot of people said I will never watch it again.

"The figures shot up at the next race, it was the biggest TV audience in Monaco for a long time because everybody had been writing about it. Everybody turned on to watch. Since then there has been a decline.

"According to Bernie, it has now started in the last few races to be quite serious and he is getting serious complaints from television companies.


Even the biggest and richest teams are going to suffer badly if the smallest three or four teams go out of business
Max Mosley

"They are in turn under pressure because there is an economic crisis.

"If they stop watching we have got to do something to make them watch. But on the certain condition you don't change the championship.

"The person who would have won it, should still win it. With the kilo per point that would still happen.

"Some of the teams are doing computer simulations of what would have happened this year had we had the system and there is no question Ferrari would have won but not by so much and not so quickly.

"In the end it is not us, it is up to the teams. The FIA is not going to go out of business if teams have to stop racing, it's the teams.

"And even the biggest and richest teams are going to suffer badly if the smallest three or four teams go out of business."

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