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  Thursday, 19 July, 2001, 13:59 GMT 14:59 UK
Rogge: Drugs here to stay
Jacques Rogge:
Rogge: "[Drugs] are sport's number one danger"
Newly-elected International Olympic Committee president, Jacques Rogge, has warned that the war against drugs will never be won.

Speaking on German television just three days after winning the race to succeed Juan Antonio Samaranch, Rogge pledged to clamp down on doping.

But he admitted that drug users will always be one step ahead of the authorities.

"We will never win the war totally, but we have to reduce the level of doping," Rogge said.

"It is the number one danger for sport."


We need to have one single procedure for testing
IOC president Jacques Rogge
The IOC has been heavily criticised for its failure to deal with doping and Rogge has earmarked it as a key issue under his tenure.

The 56-year-old Belgian, who is also a council member of the World Anti-Doping Agency, said that co-ordinated international action was crucial.

"We need to have one single procedure for testing," he said. "We need to have one single procedure for sanctioning.

"And we need to have everyone working at the same speed."

Rogge also revealed he was considering lifting the ban on IOC members visiting cities that are bidding to host an Olympics.

The ban was introduced to help salvage the IOC's credibility, tarnished after it was revealed 10 members were either expelled or resigned for accepting bribes during Salt Lake City's successful bid to stage the 2002 Winter Games.

"If the majority of the IOC members decide that it would be better to resume the visits then we will start again with the visits," Rogge said.

"However, at that time we will make sure that the IOC pays for all the costs."


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