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  Monday, 26 February, 2001, 11:11 GMT
Tributes pour in for Bradman
England captain Len Hutton and Sir Donald in 1954
England captain Len Hutton and Sir Donald in 1954
The world of cricket is in mourning, after the death of legendary Australian batsman Sir Donald Bradman.

Sir Donald died, aged 92, from pneumonia at his Adelaide home on Sunday.

He will be given a private funeral in accordance with his final wishes later this week.


His innings may have closed but his legacy will forever live on
Former Aussie captain Mark Taylor
Bradman's only son, John, said his father had asked to be privately cremated, but a memorial service for the public would be held in about two weeks time.

"The family asks that the privacy of the funeral be respected," John Bradman said in a statement.

"But the memorial service will be open to the public.

"We feel that many will share our loss. He touched the lives of others who may wish to join in celebrating his life."

Australia's best

Around the world, Bradman's death was greeted with sadness as friends and former colleagues mourned his passing.

Former Australian cricket captains Mark Taylor, Richie Benaud and Bill Brown paid glowing tributes to Sir Donald.

Taylor paid the ultimate compliment to Bradman in 1998.

After equalling his highest Test score of 334 in a match against Pakistan Taylor declared his innings closed out of respect.

"Sir Donald is certainly the greatest Australian I have met," Taylor said in a statement.

"Fifty-three years after playing his final Test match he was still revered around the world, held in incredible esteem.

"As a cricketer, the world has known no equal. He was the true symbol of fine sportsmanship, the benchmark that all young cricketers aspired to."

Bradman's former team mate Brown said Australia's favourite son was always more than just a cricketer.

"He was the pinnacle of Australian cricket. You could sum it up by saying he was a great Australian," Brown said.

"I think he'd like to be remembered as someone who certainly did his best for Australia.

"As far as I can recollect there was not a blemish I can remember on his character."

Benaud, now a highly regarded television commentator, captained Australian in the 1960s while Bradman was chairman of the Australian selection panel.

"We had a very successful time on the field because of the knowledge and awareness of those three (selectors) and particularly The Don who was very, very good," Benaud said.

"He was always a couple of overs ahead of the play, as I suspect he was on the field as well."

Legend departs

In England, former Test bowling legend Fred Trueman said the game of cricket would never see his like again.

"He was possibly the greatest batsman who ever lived," Trueman said.

The Don:  Every bowler's nightmare
The Don: Every bowler's nightmare
"He was a wonderful man and it is the passing of a legend."

When asked if he thought anyone could ever surpass Bradman's status in the world game, Trueman said: "I would not have thought so, never again or before.

"He was simply the best and I am very sad."

Former England captain Brian Close felt perhaps Bradman's greatest quality was his humility in the face of such an achievement.

"Today's players could learn a lot from him," said Close.

"It is a sad day for cricket in general because he was so well liked and looked up to."


He was the best - you can't say any more than that
Sir Alec Bedser

Sir Alec Bedser, one-time England chairman of selectors, played against Bradman.

He told BBC Five Live: "There was no-one like him, and I don't think there will be anyone like him again.

"He was a wonderful credit to the game, He was the best - you can't say any more than that."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
England captain Nasser Hussain
"He was a great player, in any era"
Former England Test bowler Fred Trueman
"He's probably the greatest batsman who ever lived"
Australian Prime Minister John Howard
"I want to express on behalf of the entire nation our sympathy"
Former Australian captain Bill Brown
"He was a great Australian"
Former Australian captain Richie Benaud
"His contribution to world cricket was immense"
Former England chairman of selectors Alec Bedser
"He was the best"
Sir Donald Bradman
"I must be one of the few men to have a copy of his own obituary"
England all-rounder Trevor Bailey
"I was thankful I never had to bowl against him in his prime"
Australia's cricket captain Steve Waugh
"His statistics are mind-blowing"
BBC News 24
charts Sir Donald Bradman's career
Sir Donald Bradman dies aged 92

Cricket's loss

A legend mourned

A life at the crease

PHOTO GALLERY

SPORTS TALK

AUDIO/VIDEO
See also:

26 Feb 01 | Death of Don Bradman
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