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Last Updated: Friday, 11 July, 2003, 11:31 GMT 12:31 UK
Spoony in a different swing
By Saj Chowdhury

BBC Radio 1's DJ Spoony is a man more renowned for spinning discs than swinging clubs.

But when the famous mix-master joined Radio Five Live's new weekly golf programme as a reporter, people soon realised his knowledge of the sport was on a par with that of music.

"I'm looking forward to my Five Live stint because it's a good way of building a bridge between the radio channels," Spoony told this website.

DJ Spoony (centre) and the Dreem Teem
I'm on a mission to bring the sport to the inner cities
DJ Spoony (centre)
"I don't know whether I'll be seen as a reporter, but I've definitely got an educated opinion on certain sports, such as golf and football.

"I'd also like to stress that I won't be leaving Radio 1 because I've got two new shows coming up soon."

Spoony, who is a third of Radio 1's popular trio the Dreem Teem, said that he was hooked on golf after his friend took him to a driving range.

"It happened about two-and-a-half years ago when I struck my first balls in anger at Kings Cross driving range in north London," he added.

"I then moved on to Stoke Park in Slough, where there's a really nice course.

"I remember getting some funny looks, not because I was black but because I was DJ Spoony."

However, the popular figure does believe there are still prejudices in golf.

"My golf club is fantastic and in a really nice area, but whenever I've visited the suburbs, where it's less cosmopolitan, I've been given funny little looks," he said.

"Although we are talking about sport, it happens in a lot of aspects of life.

"I could just be buying petrol and people would give you an unwelcoming glance.

"Things aren't the way they should be at the moment, but hopefully by the time I'm an old man these sorts of prejudices will have disappeared."

As regards getting golf exposed to wider community, Spoony believes he has the solution.

"Those responsible for promoting golf in this country should introduce the sport to schools," he said.

"When I was younger we played rugby and football but didn't have a golf course in our immediate locality.

"I think for the sake of the sport, it's important for people to know that there are no barriers when it comes to playing golf. I'm on a mission to bring the sport to the inner cities."





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Radio 1's king of the fairways
22 May 03  |  Features


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