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  Wednesday, 18 September, 2002, 13:01 GMT 14:01 UK
The magic of The Belfry
Craig Stadler stands over a missed putt in 1985
Stadler's woe contributed to the historic 1985 match

It remains one of the more intriguing questions pertaining to the Ryder Cup - why is The Belfry so special?

Is it because of the 10th hole, where matches can be won or lost through moments of bravery or stupidity?

Perhaps the 18th, a stretch of land and water which has been the undoing of both teams over the years, stands out most?

Or maybe, just maybe, it is because Europe completed their first win for 28 years there in 1985.

The sight of a teary Sam Torrance raising his arms after holing the winning putt in 1985 remains an enduring Ryder Cup image.

Sam Torrance walks up the 18th in 1985
Torrance's tears are part of The Belfry

Four years later, the Europeans were crowing again after retaining the cup against a very strong American side.

And just to show that there is a balance to this tale of European joy, the Americans triumphed in 1993 after another titanic battle.

Quite why this course, which certainly has never received the acclaim that St Andrews, Lytham or Birkdale, is so popular is something golf experts have never been able to explain.

But it has provided many wonderful memories.

Like Christy O'Connor Jnr's defeat of Fred Couples on the 18th hole in 1989, when the Irishman nailed a tremendous two-iron to the heart of the green and then gave thanks to Him upstairs.

Then there was the tremendous match between Nick Faldo and Paul Azinger in 1993, with two men at the peak of their powers playing some unbelievable golf.

Even a hole-in-one at the 14th from the Englishman was not enough to subdue his rival, who gritted his teeth to gain a vital half-point for the Americans.

But some players have experienced the kind of moments they would not wish on their worst enemies.

Nick Faldo chips in in 1993
Faldo's efforts in 1993 were sensational

Like Costantino Rocca's dreadful three-putt at the 17th in 1993, which allowed Davis Love III back into the match.

While that in itself was possibly the difference between the two teams, Craig Stadler knows how it feels to influence the tempo of a match.

In 1985, the man known affectionately as 'The Walrus', needed to hole a putt of less than three feet to ensure a point for the Americans in one of the morning's foursomes.

But pressure and nerves got the better of him as he pulled his putt to give the Europeans an unlikely half point and send them into the afternoon's fourballs with renewed confidence.

When brought together, those moments, along with the unique feel of the course and the history that it brings to the Ryder Cup story makes The Belfry a very special place indeed.

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