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  Wednesday, 18 September, 2002, 13:01 GMT 14:01 UK
Trouble down the years
Over-enthusiastic celebrations marred Brookline
Over-enthusiastic celebrations marred Brookline
BBC Sport Online looks at the long history of controversial Ryder Cup incidents.

This year's Ryder Cup will undoubtedly have a very different feel to past meetings.

The 11 September terrorist attacks on America led to the event, originally scheduled for 28-30 September 2001, being put back a year.

Organisers postponed the tournament after some American players voiced fears for their own safety while others believed the event was too soon after the attacks.

The competitive edge of old will be there when the rescheduled tournament begins on 27 September 2002, but the bitterness of some previous clashes seems unlikely to rear its head.


Brookline bust-up

Leonard's successful putt sparked wild celebrations
Leonard's successful putt sparked wild celebrations

Europe were 10-6 going into the singles at the 1999 Ryder Cup, but the United States stormed back to clinch victory.

The vital point came from Justin Leonard, who staged an amazing recovery against Jose-Maria Olazabal.

But when he sank what was effectively the match-winning putt on the 17th green, the Americans' excitement got the better of them.

Tom Lehman led the US team on a charge across the green while Olazabal still had to putt, to the fury of the European team.


The 'War on the Shore'

Pate and Pavin's headgear caused controversy
Pate and Pavin's headgear caused controversy

The spectre of the Gulf War and a somewhat gung-ho atmosphere dominated the 1991 match at Kiawah Island.

Corey Pavin and Steve Pate ignited controversy by wearing camouflaged forage caps during the Saturday fourballs.

Pate was indirectly involved in more trouble on the Sunday.

US team captain Dave Stockton failed to tell his European counterpart Bernard Gallacher that he had withdrawn Pate from the singles.

Pate had been fit to play the day before and the European team were seething about what they saw as poor gamesmanship.


Never concede, insists Snead

Nicklaus and Jacklin were team captains in 1987
Nicklaus and Jacklin were team captains in 1987

The most sporting gesture in the event's history, when Jack Nicklaus conceded a three-foot putt to Tony Jacklin in 1969 to tie the overall match, was the high point of an ill-tempered affair.

During the match, Great Britain and Ireland captain Eric Brown told his players not to look for American balls in the rough, and both captains had to come out and calm down the warring players on the second day.

American Ken Still added to the tension when he failed to acknowledge that a ball had hit him playing the 13th and playing partner Lee Trevino had to intervene.

For good measure, American captain Sam Snead was furious with Nicklaus for conceding the putt, and refused to speak to him all evening.


Bolt from the blue

In 1957, Great Britain and Ireland won 7-4, at Lindrick in Yorkshire, to claim the Cup for the first time since 1933, but the behaviour of the crowd upset America's Tommy Bolt.

After losing 4&3 in the top singles to Eric Brown, the famously short-tempered Bolt said: "I guess you won, but I did not enjoy it a bit."

Brown retorted: "And nor would I after the licking I have just given you."

Once in the safety of the changing room, Bolt laid into the behaviour of the British spectators, calling them the 'worst in the world'.


Getting in the groove

Ben Hogan collects the Ryder Cup in 1949
Ben Hogan collects the Ryder Cup in 1949

There must be something in the air in Yorkshire, because both the 1929 and 1949 Ryder Cups had their moments.

In 1929, the host side won at Moortown despite some goadung by the Americans.

The victorious US captain in 1949 was the legendary Ben Hogan, and he upset many Brits when he complained that the grooves on some of the British clubs were too deep.

They thought he was just trying to get his own back after Henry Cotton asked to inspect the American's golf balls two years before.

But Hogan was right, and Ganton club pro Jock Ballantine had to work through the night to file down the clubs to meet the right specifications.

Another bone of contention arose when the Americans brought 600 steaks with them - at a time when there was still food rationing in Britain.


The right spirit?

Samuel Ryder (c) with the 1929 Ryder Cup captains
Samuel Ryder (c) with the 1929 Ryder Cup captains
And then there is partisan crowds. Colin Montgomerie has long suffered at the hands of American galleries, but the Ryder Cup has a long history of unsporting spectators.

The first recorded instance of supporters cheering when the opposition missed a putt was all the way back in 1929, when the match was played at Moortown, in Yorkshire.

It was only the second Ryder Cup, but passions were already running high as the American pair of Johnny Farrell and Joe Turnesa found out.

When they missed a putt of about a foot, the crowd was reported to have let out a 'definite cheer'.

Of course, it would perhaps be rather foolhardy to assume this year's crowds will stay well behaved.

After all, the predominantly partisan British crowd will fervently hope Sam Torrance leads Europe to success.

What is certain is that the reaction from the crowd for the first American pair on the tee will be nothing short of warming - an apt tribute to a nation that has suffered over the past year.

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