BBC Sport golf

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Related BBC sites

Page last updated at 12:25 GMT, Wednesday, 19 November 2008

Monty to keep major hopes alive

Colin Montgomerie
Montgomerie hopes to break back into the top 50 in the world rankings

Colin Montgomerie aims to extend his playing career for at least another seven years in the belief that he can still gain a first major title.

The 45-year-old out-of-form Scot has failed to finish inside the top 20 in his last 10 tournaments and he has dropped to 118th in the world rankings.

"I'm exempt through to 2015 on this (European) tour, and I intend to be playing until that stage," Monty said.

"I've got to get back inside the top 50 to compete on the world stage again."

Montgomerie has come close on a number of occasions to breaking his major duck but success has so far proved elusive.

If I can get back in that top 50 and remain there for the next six years, I'll be very happy

Colin Montgomerie

He has been runner-up on five occasions in major championships; the US Open in 1994, 1997 and 2006, the US PGA in 1995 and the Open, behind Tiger Woods, at St Andrews in 2005.

This weekend Montgomerie is looking to win a tournament for the first time since July 2007 at the Hong Kong Open.

"I'm outside the top 100 in the world for the first time ever," he said.

"If I can get back in that top 50 and remain there for the next six years, I'll be very happy."

Montgomerie won the Hong Kong Open in 2005 and the eight-time Order of Merit winner admits it is a tournament he enjoys.

MY SPORT: DEBATE

"I like the golf course," he said. "I'm not the longest hitter on tour and, while I never was, I have control, and this is a course where you need control more than you need length or power. I prefer this type of golf nowadays.

"I like the Hong Kong Golf Club and I love the city. My wife is here with me and we're having a great time."

Print Sponsor


related bbc links:

related internet links:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.