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Page last updated at 07:34 GMT, Wednesday, 14 July 2010 08:34 UK

Paul Scholes hints at extending Man Utd playing career

Man Utd midfielder Paul Scholes
Scholes turned down the chance to go to the recent World Cup

Manchester United midfielder Paul Scholes has left the door open to continuing his playing career beyond next season.

The 35-year-old had suggested in June that he maybe only had one year left before having to hang up his boots.

However, he has now said: "I do not know if it will be my last season. I will just take every game as it comes.

"If I am feeling okay and doing the job the manager wants then we will see how things are at the end of next season."

Scholes made his United debut in 1994 and has made 643 appearances for the Old Trafford outfit.

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He signed a one-year extension to his deal in April after continuing to play an influential part for United, making 38 outings and scoring seven goals.

He headed in an injury-time winner against Manchester City towards the end of the past campaign to maintain United's title challenge but they eventually finished second to Chelsea in the Premier League and lost to Bayern Munich in the Champions League quarter-finals.

The veteran is currently with most of the Red Devils squad in the United States at a pre-season training camp ahead of a five-match summer tour.

"Hopefully next season will be another good one for me," added Scholes, who also turned down an approach from England manager Fabio Capello to come out of international retirement and go to the World Cup in South Africa this summer.



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see also
Scholes 'to play one more season'
24 Jun 10 |  Man Utd
England call too late - Scholes
07 Jun 10 |  World Cup 2010
Scholes wanted to quit - Ferguson
04 May 10 |  Man Utd
Scholes extends Man Utd contract
16 Apr 10 |  Man Utd


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