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Page last updated at 09:08 GMT, Tuesday, 22 June 2010 10:08 UK

Lloyd-Weston joins Cheltenham as three extend deals

Josh Low
Low has chosen to stay in football over his future career as a solicitor

Cheltenham Town have extended the deals of three more players and have added former Port Vale goalkeeper Daniel Lloyd-Weston to their squad.

Midfielders Michael Pook, 24, and Josh Low, 31, have both been given two-year deals and David Bird, 25, has signed for another 12 months.

It means Cheltenham have now secured five of the seven players offered terms at the end of last season.

Lloyd-Weston, 19, joins the Robins on a one-year deal.

Of those who are staying, Low's options were the most unusual, as he has completed a law degree, has a part-time summer job with a firm of solicitors and has had an offer of more work.

"It was nice to have the option, but it was always my intention to stay in football if I could," he told BBC Radio Gloucestershire.

"I spoke to the solicitors firm which I've been working at and they were fully understanding of the fact that I wanted to stay in football.

"You're a long time retired, but at the moment football's what I want to keep doing and I feel fit, good and I feel I was playing well last year and I want to keep going."

Defender Andy Gallinagh and keeper Scott Brown signed new contracts at Whaddon Road last week.

It's up to us to get some good players to go with them now so we can build a strong and competitive side.

Cheltenham boss Mark Yates

Only striker Justin Richards has turned down an offer to join Lloyd-Weston's former club Port Vale, while club captain Shane Duff is still yet to make his decision.

Robins boss Mark Yates told the club website: "I'm delighted to have the three of them available for us next season. They're good players and we all know that.

"It's up to us to get some good players to go with them now so we can build a strong and competitive side."



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