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Sunday, 1 September, 2002, 00:23 GMT 01:23 UK
Keane: 'No regrets' over Haaland
Roy Keane
Keane's autobiography has caused controversy
Roy Keane insists he has no regrets about his notorious tackle on Manchester City midfielder Alf-Inge Haaland - and admits he would probably commit such a foul again.

The Manchester United captain has also re-opened his World Cup row with Mick McCarthy, saying he hopes the Republic of Ireland boss "rots in hell".

Keane has already stated he is "not losing any sleep" about the prospect of a possible Football Association disciplinary charge over his new autobiography.


He got his just rewards. My attitude is an eye for an eye
Roy Keane on Haaland

The FA is due to decide early this week whether to bring a disrepute charge against Keane over his admission that he deliberately set out to injure Haaland in the Manchester derby in April 2000.

Speaking in Sunday's Observer Sport Monthly, the 31-year-old was asked if he had any regrets about the Haaland incident.

Keane replied: "No. Even in the dressing room afterwards I had no remorse. My attitude was, 'What goes around comes around'. He got his just rewards. My attitude is an eye for an eye."

Asked if he would do the same thing again now, Keane paused before replying: "Probably. Yeah."

The FA has said it will study the interview, having already read the controversial contents of his recently published autobiography.

'Genuine effort'

After the Observer interview was conducted, Keane apparently rang the magazine to stress he had "never in my career set out to deliberately injure any player" and had made "a genuine effort to play the ball" in the incident.

His ghostwriter, Eamon Dunphy, had used "a degree of artistic licence", the player said.

Keane also claims in the interview that Republic boss McCarthy deserves to "rot in hell"

The midfielder had initially told the magazine he wanted Niall Quinn and Steve Staunton, two Irish team-mates who sided with McCarthy, to "rot in hell as well".

But in a subsequent call Keane said he hoped to repair their friendship.

Haaland is considering taking legal action over the comments in Keane's book.

But the United captain Keane remains unconcerned about the possible implications of any charge, which could carry a lengthy ban if he is found guilty.


I wanted to be up front, maybe too up front
Roy Keane

"I am not worried about the FA, there are more important things to worry about," he told MUTV.

"Eamonn Dunphy [Keane's ghostwriter] has used his style of writing but if I am to be charged, I will face them if and when they come. I am not losing any sleep about it.

"I have been asked to do a book for a number of years and I felt this was the right time.

"I have been planning the book from last September and I have enjoyed doing it.

"But there would have been no point if all I was going to say was 'he's a jolly good fellow' or 'this was an accident'.

"I have read plenty of books and a lot of them were rubbish - I wanted to be up front, maybe too up front but it's not the end of the world."

Keane's ghost-writer Eamon Dunphy has admitted he paraphrased certain sections of Keane's book.

But that did not help rugby star Austin Healey, found guilty of bringing the Lions into disrepute after columns from the Australian tour in 2001 which were ghost-written by Eddie Butler.

Keane could be banned for four games if found guilty - although the FA did give Vinnie Jones a suspended six-month ban and a 20,000 fine after his controversial video profiling soccer's hard men in 1992.

 VOTE RESULTS
Should the FA throw the book at Roy Keane?

Yes
 74.70% 

No
 25.30% 

31713 Votes Cast

Results are indicative and may not reflect public opinion
Roy Keane faces a three-match suspension for his red card at Sunderland

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