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BBC Sport's Alan Green
"The crowd salute Bayern Munich"
 real 14k

Bayern's Bixente Lizarazu
"You need la bit of uck, one goal was going to win it"
 real 14k

BBC football pundit Trevor Brooking
"I think Bayern were the better side overall"
 real 14k

banner Wednesday, 23 May, 2001, 21:52 GMT 22:52 UK
Bayern crowned European champions
Mendieta and Effenberg both scored from the penalty spot
Mendieta and Effenberg exchanged penalties
Bayern Munich 1-1 Valencia (Bayern Munich win 5-4 on penalties)

Just as so many had predicted, the 2001 Champions League final went to penalties.

Not once, but twice.

A nail-biting shoot out ultimately won the day for Bayern, but only after a dramatic tale of three spot kicks in normal time.

Valencia, sensationally, were ahead inside two minutes as Gaizka Mendieta rolled home the first of them.

  Key moments
2 mins: Mendieta fires home from the penalty spot
7 mins: Scholl sees his spot kick saved
50 mins: A third penalty sees Bayern level through Effenberg
110 mins: Gonzales escapes after handling in the area during extra time
120 mins: Three saves from Kahn secure victory for Bayern Munich in a nail-biting shootout
Five minutes later, Mehmet Scholl fluffed a chance to equalise from the spot but, early in the second half, Bayern captain Effenberg crucially scored from penalty number three.

All three spot kicks were controversial and combined for a dramatic, if unspectacular, opening 90 minutes.

And with few golden moments in a golden-goal extra time showdown, a shoot-out seemed a fitting way to decide the game.

Bayern's Paulo Sergio and Patrik Anderson both failed from the spot but goalkeeper Oliver Kahn won the cup for Germany with a hat-trick of saves from Zlatko Zahovic, Amedeo Carboni and Mauricio Pellegrino.

Bayern's victory erased the heartache of their dramatic defeat at the hands of Manchester United two years ago, but for Valencia it marked a second successive Champions League final defeat.

Valencia's Baraja outjumps Scholl of Bayern
Valencia's Baraja outjumps Scholl of Bayern

Few fans had predicted the fireworks of the previous week's Uefa Cup final, yet the game burst immediately into life in a sensational start.

Just 80 seconds were on the clock when Valencia were awarded a dubious penalty.

Good work down the Munich left by John Carew set up Mendieta, but the Valencia captain scuffed his first attempt and then saw his chance of slotting home the rebound blocked by the prostrate Patrik Andersson.

Andersson then found himself pinned to the ground in action more suited to rugby than football and the defender was unlucky to concede a penalty as the ball was wedged up against his arm by the inrushing Mendieta.

Mendieta gratefully stepped forward to slot home the spot kick and give Valencia the early lead all the neutrals wanted.

The usually conservative Germans were immediately forced to come out of their shells and they looked to have forced an instant response when referee Dick Jol awarded a second penalty on seven minutes.

Valencia's Mendieta fires home after two minutes
Mendieta slots home from the penalty spot

Effenberg looked to have knocked the ball too far ahead of him as he looked to go round Jocelyn Angloma, but the defender took the bait and pulled down the rampaging midfielder.

Valencia were furious when Jol instantly pointed to the spot, but relieved as Mehmet Scholl saw his tame spot kick blocked by the alert Santiago Canizares.

Undeterred, Bayern continued to pile on the pressure and were dominant from that point.

Something had to give; Valencia had never won a game in Italy, yet boasted the best defensive record in the competition.

Bayern coach Ottmar Hitzfeld upped the stakes in his bid to dent the latter record as he threw on striker Carsten Jancker in place of wing back Willie Sagnol at half time.

The switch paid instant dividends as Bayern levelled from yet another spot kick.

Again there was an air of controversy as Bayern were awarded their second penalty of the game, Jancker appearing to push Carboni and force the defender to handle.

Valencia boss Hector Cuper
Hector Cuper urges calm from his Valencia players
Valencia, just as they had done to Scholl, attempted to distract Effenberg as he waited to take the kick, but the captain was unruffled and calmly sent Canizares the wrong way from the spot.

Other than spot kicks, the game offered up few chances until the final minutes of a tense game.

Valencia substitute Miroslav Djukic was denied by the alert Oliver Kahn late on then, two minutes into stoppage time, Jancker fizzed a long-range shot just wide.

Yet, somehow, the game seemed destined to be decided by spot kicks.


Bayern Munich: Kahn, Sagnol, Lizarazu, Kuffour, Andersson, Scholl, Elber, Effenberg, Salihamidzic, Hargreaves, Linke. Subs: Dreher, Sforza, Sergio, Tarnat, Jancker, Zickler, Santa Cruz.

Valencia: Canizares, Pellegrino, Mendieta, Carew, Ayala, Carboni, Sanchez, Kily Gonzalez, Baraja, Angloma, Aimar. Subs: Palop, Deschamps, Djukic, Zahovic, Vicente, Albelda, Aurelio.

Referee: Dick Jol (Holland).

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