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Page last updated at 13:52 GMT, Wednesday, 20 April 2011 14:52 UK

Blatter outlines re-election plan

By Gordon Farquhar
BBC sports news correspondent

Sepp Blatter,  FIFA president since 1998
Swiss Blatter has been Fifa president since 1998

Fifa president Sepp Blatter said world football's governing body needs "evolution not revolution" as he set out his manifesto for a fourth term.

He faces Asian confederation chief Mohamed Bin Hammam in the election on 1 June, and has set out his proposals in a letter to Fifa's 208 associations.

"In these challenging times Fifa needs first of all stability, continuity and reliability," stated Swiss Blatter, 75.

Bin Hammam's election pledge is based upon major changes to Fifa's structure.

The 61-year-old Qatari's manifesto contains proposals for change, including the creation of 17 more executive committee positions on a new 41-strong Fifa board.

Blatter, who has been at the helm of Fifa since 1998, has also promised to apply "zero tolerance and fair play" throughout the game and added that "the biggest enemies of football are corruption, match-fixing and doping".

He insisted that he will "fight those enemies" by developing the tools already put in place and referred to the "early-warning system" for irregular betting patterns as well as the transfer-matching scheme.

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The Swiss stated that under his leadership there had been a 57-fold increase in investment in football development projects when comparing the period 2007-2010 with that of 1995-98, prior to his election.

He also made an appeal to the financial interests of the member associations and pointed out that Fifa has grown its cash reserves from zero to $1.2bn (£732m). The associations were also reminded of the extra unscheduled payments they received following the success of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

Blatter, who in his letter stressed that he had "always delivered on my promises", added that there would be another additional financial dividend if the 2014 finals in Brazil prove to be a success.

On top of those handouts, he said Fifa would provide $1bn (£609m) for football development over the next four years.

The Fifa president revealed that his "proven leadership" was behind his decision to stand "in these uncertain times" and reiterated that he would definitely step down in 2015 if re-elected.

"I have all the motivation, experience, ideas and energy needed to complete my mission," he reflected.

"I have decided to stand for my fourth and final term as president because in these uncertain times Fifa needs stability to secure all that we have achieved so far and to make essential changes to our beautiful game.

"I am ready, let's go for it - together."

Blatter has pledged to "strengthen the universality of football" and said that the award of the World Cup to Russia in 2018 and Qatar in 2022 was "an important step in this direction".

He added that he hopes to enhance the quality of the game, referring, without much detail, to "key components" such as refereeing, and the laws of the sport.



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see also
Blatter reassures FA on 2018 vote
04 Apr 11 |  Football
Bin Hammam sole Fifa challenger
04 Apr 11 |  Football
Blatter 'to stand down in 2015'
22 Mar 11 |  Football
Bin Hammam wants Fifa to open up
21 Mar 11 |  Football
England miss out in 2018 Cup vote
02 Dec 10 |  Football


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