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Last Updated: Saturday, 2 December 2006, 10:34 GMT
Brooking demands coaching changes
By Alistair Magowan

Sir Trevor Brooking
Brooking has warned that English coaching is far behind Europe's
Sir Trevor Brooking fears English football may fall further behind Europe if coaching qualifications are not made mandatory in the Premiership.

The FA's development director wants to meet football's professional bodies to enforce stricter rulings for coaches.

"It would be good to set a standard right at the top level because that sends a message," he told BBC Sport.

"We need to sit down with the professional game and try to get consistency right across the board."

Brooking's comments follow the Premier League's decision to allow Gareth Southgate to continue as Middlesbrough boss despite not having the necessary qualifications.

Southgate has asked for changes to the coaching system but Brooking fears that a lack of support from clubs will delay an improvement in standards.

"We are behind a number of countries and we have to catch up," Brooking said.

"It's fair to say we came into this late. Other countries like Spain, Germany, France, even the Czech Republic are above us on those that are through on the 'A' Licence and Pro Licence.

We must get the support of the two leagues and the clubs they represent but it's a challenge

Trevor Brooking

"What we're all after is a bit of quality in this country and you have to give a bit of time and commitment to get there.

"We must get the support of the two leagues and the clubs they represent but it's a challenge.

"My ideal situation would be for everyone to have the Pro Licence and extend it beyond the Premier League but that's going to take time."

606 DEBATE: Do you agree with Brooking?

Southgate expressed the view that the coaching system set-up did not help international players from getting their qualifications.

But Uefa technical director Andy Roxburgh told BBC Sport: "The FA has the ability to administer the Pro Licence.

"There is an expertise there, but they obviously still labour against a general attitude questioning the compulsory nature.

"If you're playing international football this is where the federation comes in - the federation has to make arrangements to help the top people get through such things and we've done that along with the Federations.

"We had a group in Holland - that included Frank Rijkaard and Marco van Basten - and we had a group in Germany. Guys with over 50 caps for their country.

"We worked with those federations to create fast-tracking programmes, because of the vast experience of these guys and their strong personality there was so much potential.

"But it is very expensive and very high intensity both for the participant and the Federation, so you have to be willing to do it.

"There is nothing to stop the FA creating a fast-tracking system for vastly experienced and high level personalities.

"Where there is a will there is a way."

  • Watch more of Southgate and Brooking's views on English coaching on Football Focus on BBC One this Saturday at 1210 GMT.


  • SEE ALSO
    Coaching conundrum
    02 Dec 06 |  Football
    Southgate demands coaching change
    01 Dec 06 |  Football Focus
    What is a Uefa Pro Licence?
    01 Dec 06 |  Football
    Southgate outcome disappoints LMA
    23 Nov 06 |  Middlesbrough


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