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Last Updated: Wednesday, 5 January, 2005, 12:45 GMT
FA considers goal-line technology
THE GOAL THAT WASN'T
The Football Association has suggested it will support any moves to introduce goal-line technology into the sport.

There have been widespread calls for new technology after Spurs were denied a winner against Manchester Utd despite Pedro Mendes' effort crossing the line.

But the FA stressed it was against any wider use of video replays.

"The FA is willing to consider any goal-line technology that would improve decision-making while not disrupting the game," said the FA's statement.

"The key factor is whether a message can be transmitted immediately to the referee allowing him to take an immediate decision without interrupting play."

Mendes' speculative strike from the halfway line comfortably crossed the goal-line after an error from United keeper Roy Carroll.

But with the referee and assistant referee unable to get a proper view of the incident, the 'goal' was not given.

Both Spurs boss Martin Jol and his United counterpart Sir Alex Ferguson have called for the introduction of technology.

"We've drawn a distinction between video technology - about which there was never really a serious discussion - and goal-line technology," a FA spokesman told BBC Sport.

"We have no plans for any kind of introduction of video technology. The implications in terms of interrupting the game and so on are too much.

There is no point in introducing goal-line technology without understanding the wider issues
Referees chief Keith Hackett

"Any change in the rules would require clearance from the International Football Association Board (IFAB) of which we are a member."

The IFAB - the body that considers rule changes - meets in Cardiff on 26 February, and will discuss the issue with a presentation from ball manufacturer adidas believed to be on the agenda.

It comprises four members from Fifa and one each from the England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland FAs, because of the home nations' historic role in formulating the laws of the game.

Keith Hackett, the head of the referees' body in England, explained that the authorities were likely to proceed cautiously.

"I was at the game and from my seat in the stands I could see that it was a goal," Hackett told BBC Radio Five Live.

"It was a great pity that the assistant referee didn't have the speed - mind you, an Olympic sprinter might not have either - to get into a position to make the judgement.

I would be quite specific about what technology is used for
Alan Hansen
BBC Sport football expert
"He can't second guess, he has to be absolutely certain that the ball has crossed the line. He clearly had some doubts.

"There is a wider debate going on at the moment. The leagues in England can't have any forward movement on this until Fifa is satisfied that the technology does exist and can do the job.

"It has to cover for areas where there are a number of players on the goal-line like from a corner.

"There is no point in introducing goal-line technology without understanding the wider issues."

Meanwhile, BBC Sport football expert Alan Hansen said he would support the introduction of technology - but only in the case of goal-line decisions.

"I've never wanted it or looked for it, but I think it's inevitable because the rewards for success and the penalties for failure are so massive," he said.

"Referees need every bit of help they can get, but I would be quite specific about what technology is used for. I would limit it strictly to goal-line decisions such as the one involving Roy Carroll.

"I wouldn't get involved in things such as penalties or the like because one of the beauties of our game is the pace and intensity at which it is played.

"I'd hate to see the lost through long delays, so I would accept it for line decisions, which can be decided quickly. It would be a success because if you limit it to that then you can't go wrong."


VOTE RESULTS
Is it time to introduce video technology into football matches?
Yes
85%
No
15%
79223 Votes Cast
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SEE ALSO
Video calls after Carroll clanger
05 Jan 05 |  Football
Bookies pay out on Spurs 'goal'
05 Jan 05 |  Football



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